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Most Asian Index Futures Slide on Crude Slump as Gold Holds Gain

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Most Asian index futures dropped amid a retreat in U.S. stocks, with crude oil back below $32 a barrel on concern support for a deal to freeze output is waning. The yen maintained gains with gold.

Japanese equity-index contracts reacted to the yen’s rebound, falling more than 1 percent in Osaka and Chicago, as futures on Australian and Korean gauges also dropped. New Zealand’s benchmark opened higher, however, and futures on Hong Kong equities signaled small gains after losses Tuesday. West Texas Intermediate crude slid 4.6 percent last session as Iran’s oil minister called a plan forged by Saudi Arabia and Russia to lock production at January levels “ridiculous.” Gold held onto a 1.5 percent advance.

“Oil prices are back in the spotlight,” Jason Wong, a currency strategist in Wellington at Bank of New Zealand Ltd. said in an e-mail to clients. “We think that it’s inevitable that oil prices move back below the $30 market soon as supply continues to outstrip demand and inventory levels are very high,” he said, describing market sentiment as “gloomy.”

Oil’s retreat weighed on U.S. stocks Tuesday along with concerns about China, after an unexpected reduction in the reference rate used by policy makers in Beijing to manage the yuan fueled angst over the state of Asia’s largest economy. A gauge of expected volatility in American equities spiked 8.3 percent, rising for the first time in seven sessions as the swing back to losses reminded investors of the sense of uncertainty and turmoil that has lingered in global financial markets since the start of the year.

Singapore updates on gross domestic product Wednesday, and both Malaysia and Vietnam issue data on prices. Australia reports on wages and Philippine trade figures are also due.

Bloomberg

Is the CEO/Founder of Investors King Limited. A proven foreign exchange research analyst and a published author on Yahoo Finance, Businessinsider, Nasdaq, Entrepreneur.com, Investorplace, and many more. He has over two decades of experience in global financial markets.

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Crude Oil

NNPCL CEO Optimistic as Nigeria’s Oil Production Edges Closer to 1.7mbpd

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Crude Oil

Mele Kyari, the Group Chief Executive Officer of the Nigerian National Petroleum Company Limited (NNPCL), has expressed optimism as the nation’s oil production approaches 1.7 million barrels per day (mbpd).

Kyari’s positive outlook comes amidst ongoing efforts to address security challenges and enhance infrastructure crucial for oil production and distribution.

Speaking at a stakeholders’ engagement between the Nigerian Association of Petroleum Explorationists (NAPE) and NNPCL in Lagos, Kyari highlighted the significance of combating insecurity in the oil and gas sector to facilitate increased production.

Kyari said there is a need for substantial improvements in infrastructure to support oil production.

He noted that Nigeria’s crude oil production has been hampered by pipeline vandalism, prompting alternative transportation methods like barging and trucking of petroleum products, which incur additional costs and logistical challenges.

Despite these challenges, Kyari revealed that Nigeria’s oil production is steadily rising, presently approaching 1.7mbpd.

He attributed this progress to ongoing efforts to combat pipeline vandalism and enhance infrastructure resilience.

Kyari stressed the importance of taking control of critical infrastructure to ensure uninterrupted oil production and distribution.

One of the key projects highlighted by Kyari is the Ajaokuta-Kaduna-Kano (AKK) gas pipeline, which plays a crucial role in enhancing gas supply infrastructure.

He noted that completing the final phase of the AKK pipeline, particularly the 2.7 km river crossing, would facilitate the flow of gas from the eastern to the western regions of Nigeria, supporting industrial growth and energy security.

Addressing industry stakeholders, including NAPE representatives, Kyari reiterated the importance of collaboration in advancing Nigeria’s oil and gas sector.

He emphasized the need for technical training, data availability, and policy incentives to drive innovation and growth in the industry.

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Commodities

Nigeria to Achieve Fuel Independence Next Month, Says Dangote Refinery

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Dangote Refinery

Aliko Dangote, the Chairman of the Dangote Group and Africa’s wealthiest individual has announced that Nigeria is poised to attain fuel independence by next month.

Dangote made this assertion during his participation as a panelist at the Africa CEO Forum Annual Summit held in Kigali.

The announcement comes as a result of the Dangote Refinery’s ambitious plan, which aims to eliminate the need for Nigeria to import premium motor spirit (PMS), commonly known as petrol, within the next four to five weeks.

According to Dangote, the refinery already operational in supplying diesel and aviation fuel within Nigeria, possesses the capacity to fulfill the diesel and petrol requirements of West Africa and cater to the aviation fuel demands of the entire African continent.

Dangote expressed unwavering confidence in the refinery’s capabilities, stating, “Right now, Nigeria has no cause to import anything apart from gasoline and by sometime in June, within the next four or five weeks, Nigeria shouldn’t import anything like gasoline; not one drop of a litre.”

He said the refinery is committed to ensuring self-sufficiency in the continent’s energy needs, highlighting its capacity to significantly reduce or eliminate the need for fuel imports.

The Dangote Refinery’s accomplishment marks a pivotal moment in Nigeria’s quest for energy independence. With the refinery’s robust infrastructure and advanced technology, Nigeria is poised to become a net exporter of refined petroleum products, bolstering its economic stability and reducing its reliance on foreign imports.

Dangote’s remarks underscored the transformative potential of the refinery, not only for Nigeria but for the entire African continent.

He emphasized the refinery’s role in fostering regional energy security, asserting, “We have enough gasoline to give to at least the entire West Africa, diesel to give to West Africa and Central Africa. We have enough aviation fuel to give to the entire continent and also export some to Brazil and Mexico.”

Dangote further outlined the refinery’s broader vision for Africa’s economic advancement and detailed plans to expand its production capacity and diversify its product range.

He highlighted initiatives aimed at promoting self-sufficiency across various sectors, including agriculture and manufacturing, with the ultimate goal of reducing Africa’s dependence on imports and creating sustainable economic growth.

Dangote’s vision for a self-reliant Africa resonates with his long-standing commitment to investing in the continent’s development.

He concluded his remarks by reiterating the refinery’s mission to transform Africa’s energy landscape and drive socio-economic progress across the region.

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Crude Oil

Oil Prices Surge Amidst Political Turmoil: Brent Tops $84

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Oil prices - Investors King

The global oil market witnessed a significant surge in prices as political upheaval rocked two of the world’s largest crude producers, Iran and Saudi Arabia.

Brent crude oil, against which Nigerian oil is priced, rose above $84 a barrel while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) oil climbed over the $80 threshold.

The sudden spike in oil prices followed a tragic incident in Iran, where President Ebrahim Raisi and Foreign Minister Hossein Amirabdollahian lost their lives in a helicopter crash.

Simultaneously, apprehensions over the health of Saudi Arabia’s king added to the geopolitical tensions gripping the oil market.

Saudi Arabia stands as the leading producer within the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), while Iran ranks as the third-largest.

Despite these significant developments, there are no immediate indications of disruptions to oil supply from either nation.

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei reassured that the country’s affairs would continue without interruption in the aftermath of the tragic event.

However, the geopolitical landscape remains fraught with additional concerns, amplifying market volatility.

In Ukraine, drone attacks persist on Russian refining facilities, exacerbating tensions between the two nations.

Moreover, a China-bound oil tanker fell victim to a Houthi missile strike in the Red Sea, further fueling anxiety over supply disruptions.

Warren Patterson, head of commodities strategy for ING Groep NV in Singapore, remarked on the market’s reaction to geopolitical events, noting a certain desensitization due to ample spare production capacity within OPEC.

He emphasized the need for clarity from OPEC+ regarding output policies to potentially break the current price range.

While global benchmark Brent has experienced a 9% increase year-to-date, largely driven by OPEC+ supply cuts, prices had cooled off since mid-April amidst easing geopolitical tensions.

Attention now turns to the upcoming OPEC+ meeting scheduled for June 1, with market observers anticipating a continuation of existing production curbs.

Despite the surge in oil prices, there’s a growing sense of bearishness among hedge funds, evidenced by the reduction of net long positions on Brent for a second consecutive week.

This sentiment extends to bets on rising gasoline prices ahead of the US summer driving season, indicating a cautious outlook among investors.

As the oil market grapples with geopolitical uncertainties and supply dynamics, stakeholders await further developments and policy decisions from key players to navigate the evolving landscape effectively.

The coming weeks are poised to be critical in determining the trajectory of oil prices amidst a backdrop of geopolitical turmoil and market volatility.

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