Connect with us

Finance

Agusto & Co Forecasts $22B Diaspora Remittances for Nigeria in 2021

Published

on

Naira Dollar Exchange Rate - Investors King

The pan-African credit rating agency, Agusto & Co has projected that Nigeria’s diaspora remittances will reach $22 billion by 2021, representing a year-on-year (y-o-y) rise of five percent.

The Lagos-based firm stated this in its “2021 Nigeria Diaspora Remittance Report & Survey,” presented to members of the public.

The report anticipated a further y-o-y rise of two percent in remittances inflow to $22.5 billion by 2022. According to the report, Nigeria’s diaspora remittances dropped by 12 percent to $21 billion in 2020, from about $23.8 billion the prior year.

Head of Research at Agusto Consulting, Mr. Jimi Ogbobine, while speaking during a webinar on the report, explained that the Nigerian diaspora remittances are still an under-researched subject despite its strong bankability credentials.

He said there have been very few target-market studies on diaspora remittances in Nigeria, adding that Agusto Consulting adopted a strategy by initiating research on bankable markets with poor research coverage.

Remittances are funds transferred from migrants to their home country. They represent household income from foreign economies arising mainly from the temporary or permanent movement of people to those economies.

Remittances play important roles in the economy, helping to meet the basic needs of recipients, fund cash and non-cash investments, finance education, foster new businesses, service debts and drive economic growth.

“Previous studies have also shown that about 70 percent of remittances are used for consumption purposes, while 30 percent of remittance funds go to investment-related use,” Ogbobine explained.
He pointed out that Africa’s estimated migrant remittances of $78.3 billion in 2020 represented a modest 12 percent of the global migrant remittances.

“However, only two states within the continent represent about three-fifths of the continent’s entire migrant remittances. Egypt’s diaspora remittances of $24.4 billion in 2020 are not only the largest in Africa but also represent about a third (31.1 percent) of the continent’s entire migrant remittance.

“Nigeria ranks behind Egypt with $21 billion which represents about a quarter of the continent’s global remittances. Morocco driven by its large French diaspora represents about eight percent of the continent‘s remittance inflows with $6.3 billion. Zimbabwe continues to suffer the effects of the dysfunction in its forex regime,” it added.

According to the report, all of Africa’s top seven diaspora recipients experienced dips in remittance inflows in 2020, barring Kenya alone which grew by 2.8 percent. It revealed that Nigeria recorded the worst contractions amongst Africa’s top seven in 2020 of about 11.9 percent.

“Nigeria’s domestic policy conundrum on foreign exchange creating as many challenges to the wider macro contractions caused by the pandemic. Outside Nigeria and Kenya, the other states within the top seven bracket experienced varying degrees of contraction in diaspora remittances of between five percent to 9.4 percent in 2020,” it added.

Diaspora remittances to Africa declined by an estimated 12.5 percent in 2020 to $42 billion, almost entirely due to a 27.7 percent decline to Nigeria, which accounts for over 40 percent of such flows to the region, the World Bank recently disclosed. The Bank, in its latest Migration and Development Brief, revealed that excluding Nigeria, remittance flows to Africa increased by 2.3 percent with a 37 percent growth reported in Zambia, Mozambique (16 percent), Kenya (9 percent) and Ghana (5 percent).

It stated: “Remittances to Sub-Saharan Africa declined by an estimated 12.5 percent in 2020 to $42 billion. The decline was almost entirely due to a 27.7 percent decline in remittance flows to Nigeria, which alone accounted for over 40 percent of remittance flows to the region.

“Excluding Nigeria, remittance flows to Sub-Saharan African increased by 2.3 percent. Remittance growth was reported in Zambia (37 percent), Mozambique (16 percent), Kenya (9 percent) and Ghana (5 percent).”

In 2021, remittance flows to the region are projected to rise by 2.6 percent, supported by improving prospects for growth in high-income countries.

The report noted that data on remittance flows to Sub-Saharan Africa are sparse and of uneven quality, with some countries still using the outdated Fourth IMF Balance of Payments Manual rather than the Sixth, while several other countries do not report data at all.

Giving further insight, the report said: “High-frequency phone surveys in some countries reported decreases in remittances for a large percentage of households even while recorded remittances reported by official sources report increases inflows.

“The shift from informal to formal channels due to the closure of borders explains in part the increase in the volume of remittances recorded by central banks.”

On remittance costs, the report stated that Sub-Saharan Africa remains the most expensive region to send money to, where sending $200 costs an average of 8.2 percent in the fourth quarter of 2020.

Continue Reading
Comments

Banking Sector

Foreign Exchange: First Bank to Discontinue Dollar Transactions on Naira Card

First Bank of Nigeria has announced that international transactions on its naira MasterCard will be suspended, Starting from 30th, September 2022

Published

on

FirstBank Headquarter - Investors King

First Bank of Nigeria has announced that international transactions on its naira MasterCard will be suspended, Starting from 30th, September 2022. 

In a recent email that First Bank sent to its customers, the bank stated customers will no longer be able to perform international transactions on First Bank Naira credit card, virtual card and visa prepaid card. 

The message read, “Due to current market realities on foreign exchange, you will no longer be able to use the Naira Mastercard, Naira Credit Card, our Virtual card and Visa Prepaid Naira card for international transactions. This will take effect on 30 September 2022,” First Bank said. 

The message added that customers can only use their multicurrency and other permitted cards to make international transactions. 

“Please use your Visa Debit Multicurrency Card, Visa Prepaid (USD) Card and Visa Gold Credit Card to continue transacting abroad with limits of up to $10,000.” The statement concluded.

It could be recalled that in July 2022, Standard Chartered Bank also suspended international transactions on its naira visa debit card. 

Other banks that have suspended international transactions on naira cards include Flutterwave, Eversend and other financial technology platforms.

Investors King had earlier reported that Nigerian banks have reduced international transactions to $20 on Naira cards due to the ongoing foreign exchange scarcity in Nigeria.

The reduction started in 2020 from $500 to $100 in 2021. In March 2022, many of the financial institutions subsequently reduced international transactions on naira cards to $20. 

At the 364th Bankers Committee Meeting in Abuja in 2021, the CBN Governor, Godwin Emefiele disclosed that the apex bank will stop supplying foreign currency to Deposit Money Bank (DMBs) otherwise known as commercial banks by the end of the year.  He, therefore, urges them to source for their foreign exchange from export proceeds.

 

Continue Reading

Finance

FG Plans to Borrow to Finance 2023 Budget as Debt Profile Hits N42.84 Trillion

Nigeria’s total public debt stock is now N42.84 trillion, or $103.31 billion as of June 2022

Published

on

United States Dollar - Investors King Ltd

With the drop in oil production and Nigeria’s revenue generation, Nigeria’s public debt is projected to increase further in 2022 and 2023.

According to the Debt Management Office (DMO), Nigeria’s total public debt stock is presently N42.84 trillion, or $103.31 billion as of June 2022. 

As of March 2022, Nigeria’s total debt profile was N41.60 trillion or $100.07 billion. This shows an increase of N1.24 trillion in three months. 

Investors King learnt from the statement published on the DMO website on Tuesday that the total debt represents the domestic and external debt stocks of the federal government, the 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT).

The statement further clarified that the foreign component of the debt stands at N16.61 trillion, or $39.96 billion, the same figure it was in March 2022. While the local component increased to N26.23 trillion or $63.24 billion.

The statement also disclosed that a higher proportion (58 percent) of the external debts were concessional and semi-concessional loans which the government obtained from multilateral financial institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, Afrexim and African Development Bank. 

These concessions and semi- concessions include loans from bilateral lenders such as Germany, China, Japan, India and France,”

Meanwhile, the increase in domestic debt stock from N24.98 trillion or $60.1 billion in March to N26.23 trillion or $63.24 billion in June was due to the credit facilities which the Federal Government raised to part-finance the deficit in the 2022 budget. 

Nigeria’s rising debt profile has been a major subject of discussion among analysts. Investors King earlier reported that the 2023 budget proposal has a deficit of more than N12 trillion which will likely be financed by another set of borrowings and subsequently increase the country’s debt profile. 

Nevertheless, the Debt Management Office, however, stated that Nigeria’s Debt-to-GDP ratio remains under control at 23.06 percent, Nigeria’s self-imposed limit of 40 percent. 

Continue Reading

Insurance

Prudential Zenith Life Insurance Grows Profit After Tax by 75 in 2021

Prudential Zenith Life Insurance Limited grew profit after tax by a whopping 75% to ₦1.13 billion, up from ₦646 million recorded in 2020.

Published

on

Prudential Zenith Life Insurance

Despite rising economic uncertainties and the challenging business environment experienced in 2021, Prudential Zenith Life Insurance Limited grew profit after tax by a whopping 75% to ₦1.13 billion, up from ₦646 million recorded in 2020.

The company disclosed this in its audited financial statement for the period ended December 31, 2021, and obtained by Investors King on Monday.

In the financial statement approved by the National Insurance Commission (NAICOM), Gross Written Premium (GWP) and Annualized Premium Equivalent (APE) expanded by 16.3% and 9.3%, respectively. This was a result of the 27% growth recorded in new business acquisition for Group Life written during the period.

Similarly, investment income grew by 30% year-on-year due to a significant increase in the interest-generating assets of the company, and commission income also increased by 43% during the period.

The financial performance is a testament to the continued focus on investments, as the company remains committed to building a strong market-leading position in Nigeria by enhancing its capabilities, strengthening its digitally enabled multi-channel distribution network, and broadening the range of products and services that are available to customers in order to meet their needs.

Despite the challenges experienced during the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020, Prudential Zenith was able to achieve this strong growth in 2021 and is poised to continue improving its performance in the upcoming financial years. Prudential Zenith will continue to develop and launch unique products to meet customers’ needs, leveraging technology and its core corporate governance structure to deliver faster claims settlement. The company will also continue to prioritize the health, safety, and welfare of customers, who subscribe to its unique insurance product offerings.

Prudential Zenith Life Insurance Ltd (PZL) is a subsidiary of Prudential Plc., established in 2017 when Prudential Plc acquired a 51% holding in Zenith Life Insurance. PZL is one of the most capitalized companies in the Nigerian insurance industry with a wide range of individual products including savings & investments-linked products, endowment, and protection products designed to meet the needs of individuals and their families.  For corporate clients, the company’s product offerings include Group Life, Key-Man Assurance, Credit Life, School Fees Protection, and Mortgage Protection, ensuring that the welfare of clients’ staff and families are met.

Prudential Plc provides life and health insurance, and asset management in Africa and Asia, helping people get the most out of life by making healthcare affordable and accessible and by promoting financial inclusion. Prudential protects people’s wealth, helps them grow their assets, and empowers them to save for their goals. It has more than 19 million life customers and is listed on stock exchanges in London (PRU), Hong Kong (2378), Singapore (K6S), and New York (PUK).

Prudential Plc has insurance operations in eight countries in Africa: Nigeria, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Togo Uganda, and Zambia.  With over 1 million customers, Prudential Africa works with over 11,000 agents and six exclusive bank partnerships, with access to over 600 branches to bring value-added insurance solutions to its customers.

 

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement




Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending