Connect with us

Education

FG to Boost Internet Connection in OAU, Unilag, Unilorin, and 14 Other Institutions

Published

on

Broadband Penetration - Investors King

The federal government has approved a sum of N400 million each to boost internet connection in Obafemi Awolowo University, University of Lagos, University of Ilorin, and 14 other institutions across the country.

The approval which was disclosed by the Minister of Communications and Digital Economy, Prof. Isa Pantami, is aimed to increase broadband penetration in Nigeria. 

Investors King understands that this is in addition to the agreement which the ministry sighed with top tech company, Microsoft to train 5 million Nigerians on high-demand digital skills. 

Speaking during the award of the contracts letters in Abuja, Pantami noted that Nigeria is on course to achieve 70 percent broadband penetration by 2025. 

While highlighting the benefits of the broadband project to include improving the quality of education and overall growth of the beneficiary institutions, the minister stated that three higher institutions were selected from each geo-political zone of the country.

On the list of beneficiary institutions include Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife; University of Lagos and University of Ilorin, University of Nigeria, Nsukka; Federal University of Technology, Owerri; Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka; University of Calabar; University of Benin; and the University of Port Harcourt.

Others are Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria; Bayero University, Kano; Umaru Musa Yar’Adua University, Katsina; Borno State University; Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi; Gombe State University; Federal University of Technology, Minna; University of Ilorin; University of Abuja; and College of Education (Special), Ibadan.

In the same development, Pantami added that 20 markets, 3 each from the six geo-political zones will also benefit from the broadband projects. 

The markets include the famous computer village In Lagos, the highly patronised Wuse market in Abuja; Bodija Market in Ibadan, Kantin Kwari Market, Kano; Central Market, Lafia, Nasarawa State; Mandate Market, Ilorin; Jos Main Market, Plateau State; Jimeta Central Market, Yola; New Market, Gombe.

Others are Oja Oba, Akure, Ondo State; Kuto, Abeokuta, Ogun State; Ariaria International Market, Aba, Abia State; International Modern Market, Owerri, Imo State; Main Market, Onitsha, Anambra State; Watt Market, Calabar, Cross River; Oba Market, Benin, Edo State; and Swali Market, Yenegoa, Bayelsa State.

Continue Reading
Comments

Education

WAEC: Over 8,000 Candidates Register for First Series of Computer Based-WASSCE in Nigeria

Published

on

WAEC results

Over 8,000 candidates have registered for the inaugural Computer Based-West Africa Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) in Nigeria.

Dr. Amos Dangut, the Head of National Office for the West African Examinations Council (WAEC), made this announcement during a press conference held in Lagos.

Scheduled to commence from January 31 to February 17, 2024, the Computer Based-WASSCE for private candidates represents a significant shift in examination methodology.

WAEC, in November 2023, had revealed its plans to conduct the WASSCE for private candidates using a computer-based model.

Dr. Dangut, while addressing the media, expressed WAEC’s commitment to implementing this innovative approach despite initial resistance.

He noted that the acceptance of the innovation, as evidenced by the substantial number of entries received, bolstered the council’s resolve to move forward with the computer-based examination.

Out of the 8,285 candidates registered, 47.66% are male, while 52.3% are female, indicating a relatively balanced representation across genders.

The examination will cover 19 subjects comprising 26 papers in a hybrid mode, blending objective and multiple-choice questions with essay and practical components.

Dr. Dangut urged candidates to familiarize themselves with the requirements for the CB-WASSCE by accessing WAEC’s e-learning portal.

He underscored WAEC’s collaboration with educational authorities, security agencies, and stakeholders to ensure the seamless conduct of the examination and maintain its credibility.

The advent of the Computer Based-WASSCE heralds a new era in standardized testing in Nigeria, marking a significant stride towards modernization and adaptability in the education sector.

Continue Reading

Education

Canada Raises Cost-of-Living Requirement for Study Permit Applicants

IRCC Announces Adjustments to Financial Guidelines and Student Work Hours Effective January 1, 2024

Published

on

EU-Canada Trade Deal

The Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has revealed changes to the cost-of-living requirement for study permit applicants, effective January 1, 2024.

The new requirement, set at $20,635 for a single study permit applicant, more than doubles the existing amount of $10,000 established in the early 2000s.

The adjustment aims to align with the rising cost of living in Canada, preventing instances where students’ funds fall short of covering their expenses.

This financial guideline applies to study permit applications received on or after January 1, 2024, and is in addition to the first-year tuition and travel costs.

Furthermore, IRCC states that the cost-of-living requirement will now be annually adjusted based on Statistics Canada’s updates to the low-income cut-off (LICO), reflecting the minimum income necessary in Canada.

In addition to the financial adjustments, IRCC has extended the waiver on the 20-hour-per-week work cap for international students until April 30, 2024.

This extension applies to students currently in Canada and those who submitted a study permit application by December 7, 2023.

The waiver, initially introduced on November 15, 2022, allows students to work more than the standard 20 hours per week during the academic term.

Minister Miller also announced two updates related to the Post Graduation Work Permit (PGWP).

The provision allowing international students to include online study terms toward their future PGWP, as long as it doesn’t exceed half of the total program duration, will be extended until September 1, 2024.

However, there will be no further special extensions for PGWPs beyond this period, emphasizing IRCC’s commitment to maintaining clarity and stability in its policies.

Continue Reading

Education

Nigerian Federal Government Initiates 40% Deduction From Universities’ Internally Generated Revenues, Prompting Concerns

Published

on

University - Investors King

The Nigerian federal government has embarked on the implementation of a controversial policy that imposes a 40 percent automatic deduction from the internally generated revenues (IGR) of federal universities and partially-funded institutions.

This decision, aligned with the Finance Circular dated December 20, 2021, aims to limit the annual budgetary expenditure derived from IGR.

In a letter issued by the Accountant-General of the Federation, Mrs. Oluwatoyin Madein, the policy of a 40 percent auto-deduction was communicated to universities and institutions.

The letter, approved by the Minister of Finance and Coordinating Minister of the Economy, Wale Edun, was signed by the Director of Revenue & Investment in the office of the Accountant-General of the Federation, Felix Ore-ofe Ogundairo.

The new directive enforces that agencies and parastatals must remit up to 50 percent of their gross IGR, channeling the remaining 50 percent to the Sub-recurrent Account.

All statutory revenue lines, such as Tender Fees, Contractor’s Registration Fees, and Rent on Quarters, are to be remitted entirely to the Sub-recurrent Account.

While the federal government hinted at granting universities more autonomy to explore financing sources, this move has sparked controversy within the education sector.

Critics argue that the policy will stifle institutional activities, hinder critical projects, and potentially force institutions to increase fees, thereby impacting students and their families.

The National Association of Nigerian Students (NANS) has also voiced concerns, highlighting the potential repercussions for universities.

University authorities, meanwhile, argue that the policy contradicts the government’s perception of universities as revenue-generating entities while providing inadequate funding and inhibiting their development.

The policy raises questions about the government’s approach to education financing and may lead to increased financial strain on students.

Continue Reading
Advertisement




Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending