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Nigeria to Borrow From World Bank, China, Japan

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World Bank

The presidency on Thursday said it had approved an external borrowing plan after the cash-strapped African economy plunged into official recession.

“Low cost, long-term loans (1.25% interest, 20yr tenor)” would be sought from the World Bank, African Development Bank, China’s Exim Bank and the Japan International Cooperation Agency, it announced.

A Eurobond would also be offered “in due course” and parliament has still to sign off on the plan, President Muhammadu Buhari’s office added in a series of tweets.

Recession in Nigeria was confirmed last month, when official data showed output in the three months to the end of June fell 2.1 percent — the second successive quarter of negative growth.

That followed months of turmoil including a failing currency, rising double-digit inflation, and foreign exchange shortages that have hit business, especially imports and investment.

The decline has laid bare OPEC-member Nigeria’s over-reliance on oil revenue and the lack of economic diversity, after global oil prices began free falling from mid-2014.

Nigeria’s government is dependent on oil export sales for 70 percent of its revenue. Militant attacks on facilities in the Niger delta have compounded the effects of the worldwide slump in crude prices.

Buhari has also blamed the economic troubles on his predecessors, saying he inherited a treasury that was “virtually empty” and that “mind-boggling” sums of public cash had been looted.

He has vowed to recover the money, prosecute corrupt officials and streamline government, cutting waste and improving efficiency, as well as diversify the economy, particularly agriculture.

The government said the external loans would be used mainly in the agriculture, power, mining development and healthcare sectors.

A record 6.1-trillion-naira ($19.4-billion) spending plan was announced in this year’s federal budget to try to stimulate growth.

International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde visited Nigeria in January but said at the time that no programme was needed.

AFP

Is the CEO/Founder of Investors King Limited. A proven foreign exchange research analyst and a published author on Yahoo Finance, Nasdaq, Entrepreneur.com, Investorplace, and many more. He has over two decades of experience in global financial markets.

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Finance

Nigerian Banks’ Total Assets Rose by N11.15 Trillion

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has said the assets of Nigerian banks grew by N11.15 trillion to N64.32 trillion in the 12 months ended in April 2022.

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Retail banking

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has said the assets of Nigerian banks grew by N11.15 trillion to N64.32 trillion in the 12 months ended in April 2022.

In the report published by the apex bank, banks’ assets grew by 21% to N64.32 trillion in April 2022 from N53.17 trillion recorded in April 2021.

Kingsley Obiora, a member of the Monetary Policy Committee, in his personal statement released by the CBN, said the growth was driven by balances with CBN/banks, OMO bills, and credit to the real sector of the economy.

He said, “The banking system remained sound, stable and resilient. Total assets of the banking industry grew by 20.97 per cent from N53.17tn in April 2021 to N64.32tn in April 2022, driven by balances with CBN/banks, OMO bills, and credit to the real sector of the economy.

“As a result, the total flow of credit to the economy increased to N26.10tn in April 2022 from N21.45tn in April 2021, representing an increase of 21.66 per cent.”

Obiora explained that credit flow increased in the following sectors, manufacturing, consumer credit, general commerce, information and communication and agriculture.

On non-performing loans, non-performing loans in the banking sector stood at 5.31% at the end of April 2022, slightly above the 5% target of the apex bank and better than the 5.89% recorded in April 2021.

CBN said the improvement was due to the restructuring of facilities, efficient recovery strategies and sound management practices by Other Depository Corporations.

Mr. Johnson Chukwu, the Managing Director/Chief Executive Officer, Cowry Asset Management Limited, attributed the improvement to an increase in money in circulation.

He said, “One is the increase in money in circulation, and that increase is coming about because the Federal Government is borrowing by way and means and that is injecting liquidity into the economy and it will tremendously contribute to the level of currency in circulation, and ultimately the banking assets side.

“This is because given the level of financial inclusion, given that people hardly keep money at home, any significant increase in money in circulation will have an impact on the banks’ total assets.

“Secondly, the banks have actually seen a significant increase in loans. Loan creation also means money creation.”

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Banking Sector

Zenith Bank is Nigeria’s Best Commercial Bank for Second Consecutive Year

Zenith Bank Plc, Nigeria’s leading financial institution, has emerged as the best commercial bank in Nigeria for a second consecutive year at the World Finance Banking Awards 2022.

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Zenith Bank Award Presentation

Zenith Bank Plc, Nigeria’s leading financial institution, has emerged as the best commercial bank in Nigeria for a second consecutive year at the World Finance Banking Awards 2022. The leading bank was also named the best corporate governance bank.

The awards were in recognition of the bank’s sound digital transformation and best-in-class sustainability and corporate governance practices that over the years have led to a stellar business performance, even in a difficult economic climate like Nigeria.

At the awards presentation at the London Stock Exchange on Monday was the Group Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Zenith Bank Plc, Mr. Ebenezer Onyeagwu.

Speaking on the awards, Onyeagwu said “These awards reflect our strong business fundamentals, resilience and ability to adapt to the ever-changing dynamics of the market through our innovative solutions, as well as our commitment to global best practices. As a member and signatory to various domestic and international sustainability frameworks including the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) and the Central Bank of Nigeria Sustainable Banking Principles, we continue to support the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by creating value for our shareholders, customers, clients, investors, communities and the environment through our practices, operations and investments.”

Onyeagwu went on to dedicate the awards to Jim Ovia, CON, the Founder and Group Chairman, for his pioneering role in building the structures and laying the foundation for an enduring and very successful institution; the Board for the outstanding leadership they provide; the staff for their commitment and dedication; and the bank’s customers for making Zenith Bank their preferred financial institution.

Zenith Bank’s track record of excellent performance has continued to earn the brand numerous awards, with these latest accolades coming on the heels of several recognitions including being voted as Best Bank in Nigeria, for three consecutive years from 2020 to 2022, in the Global Finance World’s Best Banks Awards; Best in Corporate Governance ‘Financial Services’ Africa, for three consecutive years from 2020 to 2022, by the Ethical Boardroom; Best Commercial Bank, Nigeria and Best Innovation In Retail Banking, Nigeria in the International Banker 2022 Banking Awards; and Bank of the Year (Nigeria) in The Banker’s Bank of the Year Awards 2020. Also, the Bank emerged as the Most Valuable Banking Brand in Nigeria in the Banker Magazine Top 500 Banking Brands 2020 and 2021, Number One Bank in Nigeria by Tier-1 Capital in the “2021 Top 1000 World Banks” Ranking by The Banker Magazine and the Retail Bank of the year at the BusinessDay Banks and Other Financial Institutions (BOFI) Awards 2020 and 2021.

Similarly, Zenith Bank was honoured as Bank of the Decade (People’s Choice) at the ThisDay Awards 2020 and emerged winner in four categories at the Sustainability, Enterprise, and Responsibility (SERAS) Awards 2021, carting home the awards for “Best Company in Reporting and Transparency”, “Best Company in Infrastructure Development”, “Best Company in Gender Equality and Women Empowerment”, and the coveted “Most Responsible Organisation in Africa.

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Bank Account Ownership in Nigeria Increased to 45% – World Bank

The number of unbanked adults in Nigeria continues to decline as the Federal Government through the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) intensified financial inclusion efforts.

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Global Banking - Investors King

The number of unbanked adults in Nigeria continues to decline as the Federal Government through the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) intensified financial inclusion efforts.

The percentage of adults with a bank account in Nigeria rose to 45% from 30%, according to the latest World Bank report titled ‘The Global Findex Database 2021’ obtained by Investors King.

The number includes all accounts with regulated financial institutions in Nigeria.

In part, the report reads, “Individual economies saw different rates of growth over the past decade. Between 2011 and 2021, economies such as Peru, South Africa, and Uganda drove up the average with account ownership increases of 25 percentage points or more.

“Uganda, in fact, saw its rate more than triple, from 20 per cent to 66 per cent. In India, account ownership more than doubled in the past decade, from 35 per cent in 2011 to 78 per cent in 2021. This outcome stemmed in part from an Indian government policy launched in 2014 that leveraged biometric identification cards to boost account ownership among unbanked adults.

“Other economies saw much smaller increases over longer periods. Pakistan, for example, grew by just 10 percentage points over the past decade, from 10 per cent in 2011 to 21 per cent in 2021. The Arab Republic of Egypt and Nigeria increased ownership by 18 percentage points and 16 percentage points, respectively—from 10 per cent to 27 per cent in Egypt, and from 30 per cent to 45 per cent in Nigeria.”

The Washington-based bank attributed the increase in account ownership in Nigeria and other African nations to growing mobile payment adoption.

It stated, “In Sub-Saharan Africa in 2021, 55 per cent of adults had an account, including 33 per cent of adults who had a mobile money account—the largest share of any region in the world and more than three times larger than the 10 per cent global average of mobile money account ownership.

“Sub-Saharan Africa is home to all 11 economies in which a larger share of adults only had a mobile money account rather than a bank or other financial institution account. The spread of mobile money accounts has created new opportunities to better serve women, poor people, and other groups who traditionally have been excluded from the formal financial system.”

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