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Emerging Markets Slide as Dollar Strengthens

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Emerging Markets

Financial markets are reawakening to the risk that the U.S. expedites interest-rate increases, and that’s buoying the dollar while denting emerging markets and commodities.

The dollar climbed to a seven-week high and Treasuries fell, pushing two-year yields to highest since April, after Atlanta Federal Reserve President Dennis Lockhart and San Francisco’s John Williams said Tuesday two rate hikes may be warranted this year. Chinese stocks tumbled to a two-month low, while the rand led the selloff versus the greenback amid mounting political tension in South Africa. Copper and gold fell for the first time in four days.

The dollar has rebounded in May after declining in the previous three months as the Fed pushed back expectations for rate increases this year. A strengthening U.S. economy and the biggest jump in consumer prices in three years have led traders to boost the odds of a move in June threefold to 12 percent. The Fed will release the minutes of its April policy meeting on Wednesday.

“Expectations appear to be that minutes will signal that a summer hike is on the cards,” said Stuart Bennett, head of Group-of-10 currency strategy at Banco Santander SA in London. The “solidly hawkish” rhetoric from Fed non-voting members of late is proving to be dollar positive, as the possibility of a hike is not priced in by markets, he said.

Currencies

The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index advanced 0.4 percent at 6:04 a.m in New York. Australia’s dollar lost 0.8 percent. The yen slipped 0.3 percent to 109.43 per dollar, after earlier strengthening as much as 0.4 percent. The euro weakened 0.4 percent to $1.1268.

The MSCI Emerging Markets Currency Index fell 0.5 percent, the most in two weeks. South Korea’s won, Russia’s ruble, the Mexican peso and Malaysian ringgit dropped at least 0.8 percent.

The rand tumbled 1.6 percent to the weakest since March. South African Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan said rumors and accusations that he was involved with espionage are false and “malicious.” The Sunday Times newspaper has reported, citing people it didn’t identify, that Gordhan is at risk of being charged with espionage and fired.

Stocks

The Stoxx Europe 600 Index slipped 0.1 percent. Burberry Group Plc dropped 3.7 percent after the luxury-goods retailer added to the industry’s gloom by posting a second straight drop in annual earnings. Sonova Holding AG tumbled 7.1 percent after the Swiss hearing-aid maker’s second-half earnings missed estimates.

Futures on the S&P 500 were little changed after equities tumbled on Tuesday. Investors will look Wednesday to earnings from retailers including Target Corp., Staples Inc., Lowe’s Cos. and Urban Outfitters Inc. for further indications on the health of U.S. consumers after a slew of disappointing results cast doubt on their willingness to spend.

Minutes from the Fed’s April meeting will also be in focus for clues on the trajectory of interest rates after hawkish comments from regional presidents. The first month with even odds of higher borrowing costs also moved up to November from December.

The MSCI Asia Pacific Index lost 0.8 percent, led by declines in consumer-goods producers. Suzuki Motor Corp. plunged 9.4 percent in Tokyo after saying it used an improper method to test the fuel efficiency of its vehicles.

Chinese stock led declines in emerging markets, with the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index of mainland companies listed in Hong Kong losing 1.5 percent.

Commodities

Copper fell along with other metals amid rising supplies and an uncertain demand outlook in China, the world’s top consumer. Antofagasta Plc, a Chilean copper producer, said it isn’t counting on an improving global economy and expects low copper prices for another year or two, according to a statement from Chairman Jean-Paul Luksic.

Copper for delivery in three months slid 1.5 percent. Gold for immediate delivery lost 0.5 percent.

Oil fell 0.3 percent to $48.16 a barrel in New York after closing on Tuesday at the highest since Oct. 9. Government data Wednesday is forecast to show supplies slid for a second week.

Bonds

The yield on U.S. two-year Treasuries climbed to 0.84 percent, the most since April 27. The 10-year yield was little changed at 1.77 percent. That compares with a one-month low of 1.70 percent at the end of last week. Similar-maturity debt in Singapore declined by the most in three weeks, lifting the yield by five basis points to 2.01 percent.

Jan Hatzius, the chief economist at Goldman Sachs Group Inc., warned that bond investors aren’t prepared for the Fed to raise interest rates despite officials having flagged the possibility of such a move.

“The market’s underestimating their willingness to follow through on what they say,” Hatzius said in an interview on Bloomberg Television. “If you look at where the yield curve is priced — how little normalization of monetary policy is discounted — that’s very striking.”

Heta Asset Resolution AG bonds jumped after creditors reached an agreement with the Austrian government to settle a dispute over 11 billion euros ($12.4 billion) of guaranteed debt. The 1.25 billion euros of 4.25 percent notes due Oct. 31 climbed about five cents on the euro to 88 cents, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

CEO/Founder Investors King Ltd, a foreign exchange research analyst, contributing author on New York-based Talk Markets and Investing.com, with over a decade experience in the global financial markets.

Crude Oil

Brent Crude Rises to $69 on IEA Report

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Crude Oil - Investors King

Oil prices rose after the release of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA)  closely-watched Oil Market Report, with WTI Crude trading at above $66 a barrel and Brent Crude surpassing the $69 per barrel mark.

Prices jumped even though the agency revised down its full-year 2021 oil demand growth forecast by 270,000 barrels per day (bpd) from last month’s assessment, expecting now demand to rise by 5.4 million bpd. The downward revision was due to weaker consumption in Europe and North America in the first quarter and expectations of 630,000 bpd lower demand in the second quarter due to India’s COVID crisis.

The excess oil inventories of the past year have been all but depleted, and a strong demand rebound in the second half this year could lead to even steeper stock draws, the IEA said yesterday, keeping an upbeat forecast of global oil demand despite the weaker-than-expected first half of 2021.

However, the upbeat outlook for the second half of the year remains unchanged, as vaccination campaigns expand and the pandemic largely comes under control, the IEA said.

Moreover, the global oil glut that was hanging over the market for more than a year is now gone, the agency said.

“After nearly a year of robust supply restraint from OPEC+, bloated world oil inventories that built up during last year’s COVID-19 demand shock have returned to more normal levels,” the IEA said in its report.

In March, industry stocks in the developed economies fell by 25 million barrels to 2.951 billion barrels, reducing the overhang versus the five-year average to only 1.7 million barrels, and stocks continued to fall in April.

“Draws had been almost inevitable as easing mobility restrictions in the United States and Europe, robust industrial activity and coronavirus vaccinations set the stage for a steady rebound in fuel demand while OPEC+ pumped far below the call on its crude,” the IEA said.

The market looks oversupplied in May, but stock draws are set to resume as early as June and accelerate later this year. Under the current OPEC+ policy, oil supply will not catch up fast enough, with a jump in demand expected in the second half, according to the IEA. As vaccination rates rise and mobility restrictions ease, global oil demand is set to soar from 93.1 million bpd in the first quarter of 2021 to 99.6 million bpd by the end of the year.

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Crude Oil

OPEC Expects Increase In Global Oil Demand Raises Members’ Forecast on Crude Supply

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The Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) yesterday lifted its forecast on its members’ crude this year by over 200,000 bpd and now expects demand for its own crude to average 27.65mn bpd in 2021.

This is almost 5.2mn bpd higher than last year and around 2.7mn b/d higher than an earlier estimate of the group’s April production.

According to the highlights of the organisation’s latest Monthly Oil Market Report (MOMR), OPEC crude is projected to rise from 26.48 million bpd in the second quarter to 28.7 million bpd in the third and 29.54 million bpd in the fourth quarter of the year.

The report also indicated a fall in Nigeria’s crude production from 1.477 bpd in February to 1.473, a difference of just about 4,000 bpd before rising again in April to 1.548 million bpd, to add 75,000 bpd last month.

OPEC stated that its upward revision of members’ crude was underpinned by a downgrade in the group’s forecast for non-OPEC supply, which it now expects to grow by 700,000 bpd to 63.6mn b/d against last month’s report’s projection of a 930,000 bpd rise to 63.83mn bpd.

The oil cartel projected that US crude output would drop by 280,000 bpd this year, compared with its previous forecast for a 70,000 bpd decline.

On the demand side, OPEC kept its overall forecast unchanged from last month’s MOMR, stressing that it expects global oil demand to grow by 5.95 million bpd to 96.46 million bpd this year, partly reversing last year’s 9.48mn bpd drop.

Spot crude prices fell in April for the first time in six months, with North Sea Dated and WTI easing month-on-month by 1.7 percent and 1 percent, respectively.

On the global economic projections, the cartel said stimulus measures in the US and accelerating recovery in Asian economies might continue supporting the global economic growth forecast for 2021, now revised up by 0.1 percent to reach 5.5 percent year-on-year.

This comes after a 3.5 percent year-on-year contraction estimated for the global economy in 2020.

However, global economic growth for 2021 remains clouded by uncertainties including, but not limited to the spread of COVID-19 variants and the speed of the global vaccine rollout, OPEC stated.

“World oil demand is assumed to have dropped by 9.5 mb/d in 2020, unchanged from last month’s assessment, now estimated to have reached 90.5 mb/d for the year. For 2021, world oil demand is expected to increase by 6.0 mb/d, unchanged from last month’s estimate, to average 96.5 mb/d,” it said.

The report listed the main drivers for supply growth in 2021 to be Canada, Brazil, China, and Norway, while US liquid supply is expected to decline by 0.1 mb/d year-on-year.

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Crude Oil

Oil Rises Over Concerns of Fuel Shortages

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oil - Investors King

Oil prices rose on Tuesday, as lingering fears of gasoline shortages due to the outage at the largest U.S. fuel pipeline system after a cyber attack brought futures back from an early drop of more than 1%.

Brent crude futures rose 35 cents, or 0.5%, to $68.67 a barrel. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures rose 49 cents, or 0.8%, to $65.41.

Benchmark gasoline futures prices rose 1 cent to $2.14 a gallon.

On Monday, Colonial Pipeline, which transports more than 2.5 million barrels per day (bpd) of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel, said it was working to restore much of its operations by the end of the week.

Right now there’s a generalized anxiety premium being built into prices because of Colonial and it’s keeping a floor under the market,” said John Kilduff, partner at Again Capital LLC in New York.

Fuel supply disruption has driven gasoline prices at the pump to multi-year highs and demand has spiked in some areas served by the pipeline as motorists fill their tanks.

Traders booked at least four tankers to store refined oil products off the U.S. Gulf Coast refining hub after a cyber attack that knocked out the pipeline, shipping data showed on Tuesday.

North Carolina, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Transportation issued waivers allowing fuel distributors and truck drivers to take steps to try to prevent gasoline shortages.

OPEC on Tuesday raised its forecast for demand for its crude by 200,000 bpd and stuck to its prediction of a strong recovery in global oil demand this year as growth in China and the United States counters the coronavirus crisis in India.

Meanwhile, the rapid spread of infections in India has increased calls to lock down the world’s second-most populous country and the third-largest oil importer and consumer.

India’s top state oil refiners have already started reducing runs and crude imports as the new coronavirus cuts fuel consumption, company officials told Reuters on Tuesday.

On the bullish side for crude, analysts are expecting data to show U.S. inventories fell by about 2.3 million barrels in the week to May 7 after a drop of 8 million barrels the previous week, a Reuters poll showed.

Gasoline stocks are expected to have fallen by about 400,000 barrels, analysts estimated ahead of reports from the American Petroleum Institute on Tuesday and the U.S. Energy Information Administration on Wednesday.

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