Connect with us

Markets

Japan Stocks Fluctuate as Investors Weigh Yen, U.S. Data, Rates

Published

on

Stock

Japanese stocks swung between gains and losses as investors weighed a strengthening yen with prospects for lower U.S. interest rates. Economic data released Friday did little to change the view that the Federal Reserve will take a gradual approach to raising rates.

The Topix index rose 0.6 percent to 1,309.57 at the lunch break in Tokyo, erasing a loss of 0.7 percent. The index dropped 4.7 percent last week, its worst weekly performance in two months. The Nikkei 225 Stock Average added 0.2 percent to 16,197.79. The yen traded at 111.50 per dollar after strengthening 0.8 percent on Friday. Even with signs of life in American manufacturing and jobs data that topped estimates adding to optimism in the U.S. economy, traders still don’t expect higher interest rates until the fourth quarter.

“American ISM figures were encouraging. The dollar-yen is falling for now because the Fed’s stance is taken as being a bit dovish, but that won’t continue into infinity,” said Koji Toda, chief fund manager at Resona Bank Ltd. in Tokyo. “At some point the dollar will stop falling because investors will realize the U.S. economy is, after all, quite strong. And at that time we’ll could see a sudden rebound in the value of Japanese firms that do business globally.”

Odds of a Fed hike this month remained at zero even as data for last month showed that U.S. manufacturing expanded for the first time in seven months and more workers than expected were added to nonfarm payrolls, while the jobless rate crept higher as more people sought work. Expectations for a hike in June are at 24 percent, slightly higher from 20 percent prior to the economic data.

Futures on the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index were little changed after the underlying gauge added 0.6 percent on Friday to close at the highest level this year. Optimism in the U.S. economy and expectations for only gradual Fed tightening overshadowed a selloff in oil.

Car Sales

Exporters led losses on Monday in Tokyo as the stronger yen and weaker-than-expected U.S. sales figures weighed on the sentiment of automakers. Toyota Motor Corp. and Nissan Motor Co. each fell at least 2.6 percent, while Mazda Motor Corp. tumbled 5.8 percent.

Sun Corp., which surged 97 percent last month, was little changed at the lunch break after tumbling as much as 5.8 percent. Shares of the Japanese firm have risen on speculation the company’s Israeli unit is helping the FBI crack iPhones.

Kaneka Corp. surged 11 percent, the most in five years, after the Nikkei reported the chemical manufacturer has developed lithium-ion batteries that are 100 times faster than conventional technology and that can be used to charge mobile phone in 10 minutes.

Sharp Corp. jumped 5.6 percent after the Apple Inc. supplier on Saturday formally signed a rescue deal to sell a majority stake to Foxconn Technology Group. The company also said late Friday that it reached an agreement with its banks on loan terms.

Bloomberg

Is the CEO/Founder of Investors King Limited. A proven foreign exchange research analyst and a published author on Yahoo Finance, Businessinsider, Nasdaq, Entrepreneur.com, Investorplace, and many more. He has over two decades of experience in global financial markets.

Continue Reading
Comments

Crude Oil

Oil Prices Decline for Third Consecutive Day on Weaker Economic Data and Inventory Concerns

Published

on

Crude Oil

Oil prices extended their decline for the third consecutive day on Wednesday as concerns over weaker economic data and increasing commercial inventories in the United States weighed on oil outlook.

Brent oil, against which Nigerian oil is priced, dropped by 51 cents to $89.51 per barrel, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by 41 cents to $84.95 a barrel.

The softening of oil prices this week reflects the impact of economic headwinds on global demand, dampening the gains typically seen from geopolitical tensions.

Market observers are closely monitoring how Israel might respond to Iran’s recent attack, though analysts suggest that this event may not significantly affect Iran’s oil exports.

John Evans, an oil broker at PVM, remarked on the situation, noting that oil prices are readjusting after factoring in a “war premium” and facing setbacks in hopes for interest rate cuts.

The anticipation for interest rate cuts received a blow as top U.S. Federal Reserve officials, including Chair Jerome Powell, refrained from providing guidance on the timing of such cuts. This dashed investors’ expectations for significant reductions in borrowing costs this year.

Similarly, Britain’s slower-than-expected inflation rate in March hinted at a delay in the Bank of England’s rate cut, while inflation across the euro zone suggested a potential rate cut by the European Central Bank in June.

Meanwhile, concerns about U.S. crude inventories persist, with a Reuters poll indicating a rise of about 1.4 million barrels last week. Official data from the Energy Information Administration is awaited, scheduled for release on Wednesday.

Adding to the mix, Tengizchevroil announced plans for maintenance at one of six production trains at the Tengiz oilfield in Kazakhstan in May, further influencing market sentiment.

As the oil market navigates through a landscape of economic indicators and geopolitical events, investors remain vigilant for cues that could dictate future price movements.

Continue Reading

Commodities

Dangote Refinery Cuts Diesel Price to ₦1,000 Amid Economic Boost

Published

on

Aliko Dangote - Investors King

Dangote Petroleum Refinery has reduced the price of diesel from ₦1200 to ₦1,000 per litre.

This price adjustment is in response to the demand of oil marketers, who last week clamoured for a lower price.

Just three weeks ago, the refinery had already made waves by lowering the price of diesel to ₦1,200 per litre, a 30% reduction from the previous market price of around ₦1,600 per litre.

Now, with the latest reduction to ₦1,000 per litre, Dangote Refinery is demonstrating its commitment to providing accessible and affordable fuel to consumers across the country.

This move is expected to have far-reaching implications for Nigeria’s economy, particularly in tackling high inflation rates and promoting economic stability.

Aliko Dangote, Africa’s richest man and the owner of the refinery, expressed confidence that the reduction in diesel prices would contribute to a drop in inflation, offering hope for improved economic conditions.

Dangote stated that the Nigerian people have demonstrated patience amidst economic challenges, and he believes that this reduction in diesel prices is a step in the right direction.

He pointed out the aggressive devaluation of the naira, which has significantly impacted the country’s economy, and sees the price reduction as a positive development that will benefit Nigerians.

With this latest move, Dangote Refinery is not only reshaping the fuel market but also reaffirming its commitment to driving positive change and progress in Nigeria.

The reduction in diesel prices is expected to provide relief to consumers, businesses, and various sectors of the economy, paving the way for a brighter and more prosperous future.

Continue Reading

Crude Oil

IEA Cuts 2024 Oil Demand Growth Forecast by 100,000 Barrels per Day

Published

on

Crude Oil

The International Energy Agency (IEA) has reduced its forecast for global oil demand growth in 2024 by 100,000 barrels per day (bpd).

The agency cited a sluggish start to the year in developed economies as a key factor contributing to the downward revision.

According to the latest Oil Market Report released by the IEA, global oil consumption has continued to experience a slowdown in growth momentum with first-quarter growth estimated at 1.6 million bpd.

This figure falls short of the IEA’s previous forecast by 120,000 bpd, indicating a more sluggish demand recovery than anticipated.

With much of the post-Covid rebound already realized, the IEA now projects global oil demand to grow by 1.2 million bpd in 2024.

Furthermore, growth is expected to decelerate further to 1.1 million bpd in the following year, reflecting ongoing challenges in the market.

This revision comes just a month after the IEA had raised its outlook for 2024 oil demand growth by 110,000 bpd from its February report.

At that time, the agency had expected demand growth to reach 1.3 million bpd for 2024, indicating a more optimistic outlook compared to the current revision.

The IEA’s latest demand growth estimates diverge significantly from those of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). While the IEA projects modest growth, OPEC maintains its forecast of robust global oil demand growth of 2.2 million bpd for 2024, consistent with its previous assessment.

However, uncertainties loom over the global oil market, particularly due to geopolitical tensions and supply disruptions.

The IEA has highlighted the impact of drone attacks from Ukraine on Russian refineries, which could potentially disrupt fuel markets globally.

Up to 600,000 bpd of Russia’s refinery capacity could be offline in the second quarter due to these attacks, according to the IEA’s assessment.

Furthermore, unplanned outages in Europe and tepid Chinese activity have contributed to a lowered forecast of global refinery throughputs for 2024.

The IEA now anticipates refinery throughputs to rise by 1 million bpd to 83.3 million bpd, reflecting the challenges facing the refining sector.

The situation has raised concerns among policymakers, with the United States expressing worries over the impact of Ukrainian drone strikes on Russian oil refineries.

There are fears that these attacks could lead to retaliatory measures from Russia and result in higher international oil prices.

As the global oil market navigates through these challenges, stakeholders will closely monitor developments and adjust their strategies accordingly to adapt to the evolving landscape.

Continue Reading
Advertisement




Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending