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Nigerian Student Studying in Morocco Named in the Top 50 Shortlist for $100,000 Chegg.org Global Student Prize 2022

Stanley Anigbogu, a 22-year-old student from Onitsha, Anambra State, has been shortlisted for a $100,000 award.

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Stanley Anigbogu

Stanley Anigbogu, a 22-year-old student from Onitsha, Anambra State, Nigeria, currently studying Multimedia Development on full scholarship at The National School of Applied Sciences, Kenitra, Morocco, has been included in the top 50 shortlist for the Chegg.org Global Student Prize 2022, an annual $100,000 award to be given to one exceptional student that has made a real impact on learning, the lives of their peers and on society beyond.

Stanley Anigbogu was selected from almost 7,000 nominations and applications from 150 countries.

The Varkey Foundation partnered with Chegg.org to launch the annual Global Student Prize last year, a sister award to its $1 million Global Teacher Prize. It was established to create a powerful new platform that shines a light on the efforts of extraordinary students everywhere who, together, are reshaping our world for the better. The prize is open to all students who are at least 16 years old and enrolled in an academic institution or training and skills program. Part-time students as well as students enrolled in online courses are also eligible for the prize.

Stanley Anigbogu is a Nigerian-born changemaker, STEM advocate, entrepreneur and creative technologist studying Multimedia Development on full scholarship at The National School of Applied Sciences, Kenitra, Morocco. During his time in Morocco, he was recognized by the Nigerian Student Association as the most innovative/creative student in 2021. He is the founder of ArtecHubs Nigeria, a leading STEM skill acquisition company for young minds in southeast Nigeria, is passionate about closing the gender gap in STEM and reducing inequity among children in rural areas, and is also an internationally recognised, award winning innovator and filmmaker.

Stanley has also initiated a number of other projects targeted at addressing educational issues that affect children in Nigeria’s rural and suburban neighborhoods such as The Dream Box Initiative, Stem4Her which has to date equipped up to 1500 rural girls with skills in STEM, and Sparknuit, a disruptive startup providing reliable, available, and cheap sources of electricity for people in hard-to-reach areas as well as solar-powered lamps so that children may study and see clearly at night. Stanley’s initiatives have received global recognition from international organizations such as the Diana Award, and he has also participated as a facilitator and speaker at events such as the Nigeria Edtech Summit, Berlin Science Week, RDC Science Week, and Morocco Science Week.

Dan Rosensweig, CEO of Chegg, said: “Since its launch last year, the Global Student Prize has given incredible students all over the world a chance to share their stories, connect with each other, and reach influencers in education and beyond. Now, more than ever, students like Stanley deserve to have their stories told and have their voices heard. After all, we need to harness their dreams, their insights, and their creativity to tackle the daunting and urgent challenges facing our world.

“Our finalists this year have made a huge impact in areas from the environment to equality and justice, from health and wellbeing to education and skills, from youth empowerment to ending poverty. I can’t wait to see how this year’s inspiring cohort of changemakers use this platform to make their voices louder, and their work lift up even more lives”

Sunny Varkey, founder of the Varkey Foundation, said: “I extend my warmest congratulations to Stanley. His story is a testament to the crucial role that education plays in building a better tomorrow for us all. It is the key to solving humanity’s greatest challenges, from war and conflict to climate change to growing inequality. As time runs out to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, it is more important than ever to prioritize education so we can face the future with confidence.”

Applications and nominations for this year’s Global Student Prize opened on Thursday 27 January and closed on Sunday 1 May. Students are being assessed on their academic achievement, impact on their peers, how they make a difference in their community and beyond, how they overcome the odds to achieve, how they demonstrate creativity and innovation, and how they operate as global citizens.

Last year’s winner was Jeremiah Thoronka, a 21-year-old student from Sierra Leone, who launched a start-up called Optim Energy that transforms vibrations from vehicles and pedestrian footfall on roads into an electric current. With just two devices, the start-up provided free electricity to 150 households comprising around 1,500 citizens, as well as 15 schools where more than 9,000 students attend.

The top 10 finalists of the Global Student Prize are expected to be announced in August this year. The winner, who will be announced later in the year, will be chosen from the top 10 finalists by the Global Student Prize Academy, made up of prominent individuals.

If students were nominated, the person nominating them was asked to write a brief description online explaining why. The student being nominated was then sent an email inviting them to apply for the prize. Applicants were able to apply in English, Mandarin, Arabic, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Russian. To join the conversation online follow @cheggdotorg.

Is the CEO/Founder of Investors King Limited. A proven foreign exchange research analyst and a published author on Yahoo Finance, Businessinsider, Nasdaq, Entrepreneur.com, Investorplace, and many more. He has over two decades of experience in global financial markets.

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WAEC: Over 8,000 Candidates Register for First Series of Computer Based-WASSCE in Nigeria

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Over 8,000 candidates have registered for the inaugural Computer Based-West Africa Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) in Nigeria.

Dr. Amos Dangut, the Head of National Office for the West African Examinations Council (WAEC), made this announcement during a press conference held in Lagos.

Scheduled to commence from January 31 to February 17, 2024, the Computer Based-WASSCE for private candidates represents a significant shift in examination methodology.

WAEC, in November 2023, had revealed its plans to conduct the WASSCE for private candidates using a computer-based model.

Dr. Dangut, while addressing the media, expressed WAEC’s commitment to implementing this innovative approach despite initial resistance.

He noted that the acceptance of the innovation, as evidenced by the substantial number of entries received, bolstered the council’s resolve to move forward with the computer-based examination.

Out of the 8,285 candidates registered, 47.66% are male, while 52.3% are female, indicating a relatively balanced representation across genders.

The examination will cover 19 subjects comprising 26 papers in a hybrid mode, blending objective and multiple-choice questions with essay and practical components.

Dr. Dangut urged candidates to familiarize themselves with the requirements for the CB-WASSCE by accessing WAEC’s e-learning portal.

He underscored WAEC’s collaboration with educational authorities, security agencies, and stakeholders to ensure the seamless conduct of the examination and maintain its credibility.

The advent of the Computer Based-WASSCE heralds a new era in standardized testing in Nigeria, marking a significant stride towards modernization and adaptability in the education sector.

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Canada Raises Cost-of-Living Requirement for Study Permit Applicants

IRCC Announces Adjustments to Financial Guidelines and Student Work Hours Effective January 1, 2024

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The Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has revealed changes to the cost-of-living requirement for study permit applicants, effective January 1, 2024.

The new requirement, set at $20,635 for a single study permit applicant, more than doubles the existing amount of $10,000 established in the early 2000s.

The adjustment aims to align with the rising cost of living in Canada, preventing instances where students’ funds fall short of covering their expenses.

This financial guideline applies to study permit applications received on or after January 1, 2024, and is in addition to the first-year tuition and travel costs.

Furthermore, IRCC states that the cost-of-living requirement will now be annually adjusted based on Statistics Canada’s updates to the low-income cut-off (LICO), reflecting the minimum income necessary in Canada.

In addition to the financial adjustments, IRCC has extended the waiver on the 20-hour-per-week work cap for international students until April 30, 2024.

This extension applies to students currently in Canada and those who submitted a study permit application by December 7, 2023.

The waiver, initially introduced on November 15, 2022, allows students to work more than the standard 20 hours per week during the academic term.

Minister Miller also announced two updates related to the Post Graduation Work Permit (PGWP).

The provision allowing international students to include online study terms toward their future PGWP, as long as it doesn’t exceed half of the total program duration, will be extended until September 1, 2024.

However, there will be no further special extensions for PGWPs beyond this period, emphasizing IRCC’s commitment to maintaining clarity and stability in its policies.

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Nigerian Federal Government Initiates 40% Deduction From Universities’ Internally Generated Revenues, Prompting Concerns

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The Nigerian federal government has embarked on the implementation of a controversial policy that imposes a 40 percent automatic deduction from the internally generated revenues (IGR) of federal universities and partially-funded institutions.

This decision, aligned with the Finance Circular dated December 20, 2021, aims to limit the annual budgetary expenditure derived from IGR.

In a letter issued by the Accountant-General of the Federation, Mrs. Oluwatoyin Madein, the policy of a 40 percent auto-deduction was communicated to universities and institutions.

The letter, approved by the Minister of Finance and Coordinating Minister of the Economy, Wale Edun, was signed by the Director of Revenue & Investment in the office of the Accountant-General of the Federation, Felix Ore-ofe Ogundairo.

The new directive enforces that agencies and parastatals must remit up to 50 percent of their gross IGR, channeling the remaining 50 percent to the Sub-recurrent Account.

All statutory revenue lines, such as Tender Fees, Contractor’s Registration Fees, and Rent on Quarters, are to be remitted entirely to the Sub-recurrent Account.

While the federal government hinted at granting universities more autonomy to explore financing sources, this move has sparked controversy within the education sector.

Critics argue that the policy will stifle institutional activities, hinder critical projects, and potentially force institutions to increase fees, thereby impacting students and their families.

The National Association of Nigerian Students (NANS) has also voiced concerns, highlighting the potential repercussions for universities.

University authorities, meanwhile, argue that the policy contradicts the government’s perception of universities as revenue-generating entities while providing inadequate funding and inhibiting their development.

The policy raises questions about the government’s approach to education financing and may lead to increased financial strain on students.

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