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deVere to Position $2bn in Environmental Investments in 5 Years

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One of the world’s largest independent financial advisory, asset management and fintech organisations has doubled its commitment on positioning assets under advisement into environmental, social and governance (ESG) investments.

At the beginning of the year, deVere Group, which operates in more than 100 countries globally, said it would aim to have $1bn in socially responsible investment vehicles within five years.

The game-changing financial powerhouse now says its target is “$2bn or more” within the same time frame.

deVere’s dramatic doubling of its pledge comes as world leaders, industry chiefs and experts head to Glasgow this weekend for the start of COP26, an event seen as a critical turning point in the struggle to avert the worst effects of climate change.

CEO and founder of deVere, Nigel Green, says: “Climate change – and the major, far-reaching fallout of it for economies and communities around the world – is the greatest risk multiplier. There’s no question that it is the defining issue of our time.

“In the 2020 annual risk report from the World Economic Forum (WEF), the top five risks in terms of probability were environmental, and the top four of five risks in terms of impact were both social and environmental in nature.

“Our climate is changing at a quicker rate than previously predicted. We’re already noticing the impacts of human-created global warming.”

He continues: “As a society, we have a small window of opportunity to slam on the brakes to save our planet.

“But this takes determination, honesty and resources. It requires unprecedented levels of investment, which is why deVere is now aiming to position $2bn into ESG investments within five years.”

The deVere CEO and founder says the new target is achievable as investors, keen to get ahead of the curve “as well as earn profits with purpose”, are receptive to the opportunities as the world scrabbles to mitigate the environmental, economic and social fallout of the current situation – “a situation which is likely to be a constant risk.”

In addition, the latest research “underscores that the majority of environmental, social and governance investments are continuing to outperform their non-sustainable counterparts and have lower volatility.”

As well as its $2bn commitment, deVere is one of 18 founding signatories of the UN-backed Net Zero initiative, the international alliance of powerhouse global finance companies that will help accelerate the transition to a net zero financial system.

Its membership means it is committed to “aligning all relevant products and services to achieve net zero greenhouse gases by 2050 and to set meaningful interim targets for 2025.”

The organisation has also confirmed that it “aims to significantly speed-up its own meeting of these Science Based Targets to reduce operational emissions in line with limiting global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees Centigrade.”

UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has said: “Uniting the world’s banks and financial institutions behind the global transition to net zero is crucial to unlocking the finance we need to get there – from backing pioneering firms and new technologies to building resilient economies around the world.

Mr Green concludes: “The clock is ticking and after decades of inaction our planet hasn’t got the luxury of time.

“We all need to be taking more action and at a quicker pace.”

Is the CEO/Founder of Investors King Limited. A proven foreign exchange research analyst and a published author on Yahoo Finance, Nasdaq, Entrepreneur.com, Investorplace, and many more. He has over two decades of experience in global financial markets.

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Investment

AFDB, Others Invest $618 Million in Nigeria’s Digital Programme

African Development Bank (AFDB), French Development Agency (FDA), and The Islamic Development Bank (ISDB) have invested the sum of $618 Million in Nigeria’s Digital and Creative Enterprises Programme.

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Akinwunmi AfDB

African Development Bank (AFDB), French Development Agency (FDA), and The Islamic Development Bank (ISDB) have invested the sum of $618 Million in Nigeria’s Digital and Creative Enterprises Programme.

President of the African Development Bank (AFDB), Mr. Akinwumni Adesina while speaking at Nigeria International Economic Partnership Forum held in New York, disclosed that investment in the program would help in the establishment of 451 digital technology SMEs and 225 creative start-ups.

Adding that the enterprises would create 6.1 million jobs and add $6.4 billion to the Nigerian economy.

He said, “That is the power of international partnerships working for Nigeria. Investors must recognize this and invest.

“The future is not just digital, the future will be driven by digital revolution. Today, Nigeria has five of the seven unicorns in Africa and raised almost $1.4 billion of the total of four billion dollars raised by Fintech companies across Africa in 2021.

“When you think of financial services digital innovations, think Nigeria, with Flutterwave, OPay, Andela, and Interswitch holding the status of unicorn companies, worth at least one billion dollars each.”

Mr. Akinwunmi further stated that $540 million have been provided by the International Fund for Agricultural Development and ISDB to develop Special Agro-industrial processing zones to help unlock Nigeria’s agricultural potential.

Noting that the funds will boost food production and agribusiness value chains across Nigeria and make Nigeria more competitive.

He also called for increased international partnerships in Nigeria, adding that the bank had invested $44 billion in infrastructure in Africa over the past six years.

Furthermore, Mr. Adesina disclosed that the growth in Nigeria would depend on its ability to fix its infrastructure deficits.

His words, “The National Integrated Infrastructure Masterplan shows that Nigeria will need total financing of $759 billion to support infrastructure over a 23-year horizon (2020-2043).

“These covers tackling the crippling lack of energy to power the economy, including power generation, transmission and distribution infrastructure, water and sanitation, and transport infrastructure.”

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Foreign Investors Boycott Nigeria Oil Sector; Capital Inflow Drops By 82%

Capital inflow into Nigeria’s oil sector has dropped by more than 82 percent in the second quarter of 2022. 

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Despite the increase in global oil prices, capital inflow into Nigeria’s oil sector has dropped by more than 82 percent in the second quarter of 2022. 

Investors King learnt that while other sectors such as baking and manufacturing contributed immensely to the country’s economy, oil and gas barely make an impact. 

Data from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) indicated that foreign capital inflow into the oil and gas sector accounts for 0.13 percent of fresh foreign investments into the Nigerian economy in Q2 2022, compared to other sectors like the banking and production sector contributing 42 percent and 15 percent respectively.

It is further revealed that the total value of foreign capital investment attracted by the petroleum industry in the second quarter of 2022 fell from $11.3 million in Q2 2021 to $1.93 million in Q2 2022.

Ola Alokolaro, a partner at Advocaat Law Practice (Energy and Infrastructure) disclosed that this is the lowest for Nigeria in 11 years.

He indicated further that the weak foreign investment in Nigeria’s oil and gas sector started in 2021.  

It is evident that foreign investors are boycotting Nigeria’s oil for other places. Recently, Italian oil giant Eni agreed to acquire two producing fields in Algeria for an undisclosed sum, including stakes in two major natural gas projects, as the company plans divestments away from Nigerian onshore assets.

A French multinational oil company, TotalEnergies has also announced plans to sell its stake in a oil joint venture in Nigeria and invest about $850 million in oil projects in Angola.

Nigeria’s oil production has been facing one of its most turbulent times. Widespread oil theft and poor patronage are some of the prevailing challenges. Investors King had earlier reported that for the first time in five years, Nigeria lost its crown as Africa’s largest oil producer to Angola. 

 

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Nigeria’s Banking Sector Leads Foreign Direct Investment; Attracts Over $15 Billion in 5 Years

In the last five years, the banking sector has attracted $15.8 billion in Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)

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In the last five years, the banking sector has attracted $15.8 billion in Foreign Direct Investment (FDI). This figure reflects 23 percent of the total capital importation into the country in the period. 

According to data from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), Nigeria attracted $69.39 billion in both foreign portfolio and foreign direct investments (FDIs) within five years.

Aside from the shares portfolio, the Nigeria banking sector was the most favoured by foreign investors with almost one-fourth of the country’s foreign capital inflow.

From January 2017 to December 2021, about $26.21 billion was invested in Nigeria through shares portfolios. Between 2017 and 2018, the banking sector’s share of the total capital importation accounts for 61.5 percent.

It however dropped downward to 22 percent in 2019, to 19 percent in 2020 and 16 percent in 2021. 

Nonetheless, the Nigerian banking sector shares still enjoy considerable attention from foreign investors. 

From an estimated $3.11 billion in foreign capital inflows recorded in the first half (H1) of the year,  the banking sector accounted for N1.47 billion or 47 percent, while only N301 million, representing 10 percent was invested in equities. 

In the second quarter (Q2), production and telecommunications also competed strongly with 15.24 and 10 percent respective shares of the capital importation value. General financing was 12.85 percent, while trading attracted 3.68 percent, and agriculture had a meagre 3.74 percent.

According to NBS, “The total value of capital importation into Nigeria stood at $1.535 billion from $875.62 million in the corresponding quarter of 2021, showing an increase of 75.34 per cent. When compared to the preceding quarter, capital importation decreased by 2.4 per cent from $1.573 billion.

“The largest amount of capital importation was received through portfolio investment, which accounted for 49.33 per cent ($757.32 million)”.

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