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Dangote Cement Boosts Sub-Saharan Africa’s Economic Development

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Dangote Cement - Investors King

Operating in 10 African countries, Dangote Cement has significantly boost Sub-Saharan Africa Economic Development and play major roles in attracting Investors and job creation.

Sub-Saharan Africa is populated by more than half a billion people, and rapid urbanisation is creating challenges in the areas of housing, roads, railways, power supply, dams and water pipelines – aspects of infrastructure that are critical to the well-being of the population.

This situation indicates that cement and concrete will play a major role in construction technology in Africa, an aspect that makes the continent an attractive destination for investors.

The Dangote Group has taken cognizance and advantage of the cement demand in Africa by investing in 10 sub-Saharan counties like Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Zambia, Ghana, Congo, and Sierra Leone.

Remarkably, the Dangote Cement plant has successfully operated in Senegal in the last five years, producing 32.5 and 42.5-grades, thereby offering the domestic market higher-quality cement at competitive prices.

The company’s 1.5Mta factory located in Pout, about 60km from Dakar, was commissioned at the end of December 2014 to take advantage of the geographical strategic location, strong demand and abundant limestone deposits.

Country Manager, Dangote Cement, Senegal, Luk Haelterman, said: “before our entry, the domestic market was almost entirely made up of 32.5-grade cement. Our plant produces 42.5-grade cement, thereby offering the market higher-quality cement at a competitive price, which the construction industry urgently needs.”

Dangote Cement Senegal’s integrated plant is modern, fuel-efficient that uses the latest technology to produce high-quality cement. This enables the company to compete very effectively in a Sub-Saharan cement industry that is fragmented and characterised by smaller-scale operators with older technologies.

Haelterman described Dangote Cement’s investment in Senegal as one of the biggest foreign direct investments by an African company, which is an indication of its strong belief in the future growth of its economy.

He said the market has potential for growth for both local consumption and export, despite being saturated by other cement brands, saying, “apart from capturing the local market in Senegal, we also now export cement to neighbouring countries of Mali, The Gambia and Guinea-Bissau.”

Haelterman attributed the company’s outstanding performance in Senegal to stringent quality assurance processes, which were deployed to ensure that customers get high-quality products that meet all the required technical standards.

According to him, Dangote’s introduction of the 42.5-degree brand of cement to the major market in Senegal upon entry has enabled the company to gain the desired market share in the country.

Luk also disclosed that Dangote Cement Senegal has developed a culture of supporting local employees and prioritising local hiring, which allows local country employees have the necessary knowledge, experience, and support to take up key roles within the company.

He said the policy aims to gradually reduce the number of expatriates employed by the business by enhancing the skills and capacity of Senegalese employees to take up leadership positions.

“We have ensured that our image has been aligned with two key principles from day one: maintaining high quality, and taking a local approach in everything that we do,” he said.

Human resources manager, Dangote Cement, Senegal, Waly Diouf, said the company takes training and development of employees as a priority. “Today, Dangote Senegal has about 800 employees. We make sure that we invest heavily in the training and development of employees. We have a programme, which enables us to boost the skills of local staff at all levels. Dangote Cement Senegal is one of the best plants in Africa. This consistent training of indigenous manpower has made our plant one of the best in Africa ” he disclosed.

Chief finance officer, Dangote Cement, Senegal, Ousmane Mbaye, said the company has contributed significantly to the development of Senegal’s economy, saying, “Dangote Senegal started operation in Senegal in 2015, and between 2015 and 2019, the company has contributed heavily into the Senegalese government treasury, thereby assisting in economic development.”

Head of mines, Dangote Cement, Senegal, Leyti Ndiaye added that “our job is to supply raw materials to the plant and make sure that blending of the limestone is done correctly. We operate under very strict environmental regulations. As a company, we have a sustainable environment management plan so as to reduce environmental degradation during operation as well as restoration of degraded lands after final mine closure.”

Chief executive officer, National Sector Mining Company, Ousmane Cisse commended Dangote Cement for investing massively in the Senegalese economy. “I am very proud to have Dangote Cement in Senegal. Dangote has been able to satisfy the Senegalese cement market since its inception in 2015. When Dangote arrived here, there were two players in the market. Dangote brought quantity and quality products through the introduction of 45.2R. Dangote has helped cement consumers in Senegal to access quality cement products.

“The company is also satisfying markets in the surrounding countries. When you visit Dangote, you will discover that most of the employees are Senegalese. The company has employed Senegalese and ensure adequate capacity building for everybody,” he stated.

The best practices adopted by the Dangote Cement Senegal Plant over the past five years have boosted its production process and quality of its products, with a corresponding positive impact on the economy of the country, Sub-Saharan Africa and the continent as a whole. This is a plus for development.

Dangote Cement has a production capacity of 48.6 million tonnes per year across 10 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Group has integrated factories in seven countries, clinker grinding plant in Cameroon, and import and distribution facilities for bulk cement in Ghana and Sierra Leone. Together, these operations make the Group the largest cement producer in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Based in Nigeria, the Group operates in many of Sub-Saharan Africa’s key cement markets, helping the continent become self-sufficient in this basic commodity. In 2020, it started shipping clinker to West and Central Africa from Nigeria. Its regional strategy stated that it look for markets that have ample limestone, thriving economies, growing populations, and a pressing need for housing and infrastructure.

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Nigeria’s Dangote Refinery Breaks Into Asian Market with LSSR Shipment

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Aliko Dangote - Investors King

In a historic move, Dangote Refinery is set to ship low-sulfur straight-run fuel oil (LSSR) from Nigeria to Singapore this week, its entry into the Asian market.

This development represents a significant milestone for the refinery, which began operations in January following a $20 billion investment.

According to ship tracking data and market sources, the refinery will initiate a new trade route from Nigeria to Asia, a region that consistently demands low-sulfur fuel oil for ship refueling at Singapore, the world’s largest bunker hub.

The Glencore-chartered vessel, Front Brage, will deliver approximately 124,000 metric tons (787,400 barrels) of LSSR to Singapore, with the shipment expected to arrive on Wednesday.

The Dangote Refinery, with a processing capacity of up to 650,000 barrels of products per day, is poised to become the largest refinery in Africa and Europe once it reaches full capacity.

Since March, the refinery has increased its LSSR exports, primarily sending cargoes to the Americas and Europe, as reported by ship tracking data from Kpler and Vortexa.

“This first shipment to Asia marks a new chapter in Dangote Refinery’s expansion strategy,” said a market analyst. “Breaking into the Asian market underscores the refinery’s growing influence and its capability to meet diverse global fuel demands.”

Market sources suggest that the cargo was redirected to Asia due to weaker demand in Europe. Data from LSEG indicates that the east-west spread for front-month 0.5 percent LSFO, reflecting the price difference between these regions, stayed above $40 per ton this week.

Dangote’s LSSR cargoes are priced against Rotterdam’s 0.5 percent LSFO quotes on a free-on-board basis, although the specific pricing differential for this shipment was not disclosed by market sources.

This pioneering shipment is the beginning of a series of exports to Asia. Another LSSR shipment from the Dangote refinery, containing around 157,000 tons, is expected to reach Singapore in July aboard the vessel Stena Suede, based on ship tracking data.

LSSR is typically blended with other fuels to create low-sulfur fuel oil (LSFO) for bunkering or used as feedstock in various refinery processes.

This export initiative not only diversifies Dangote Refinery’s market reach but also enhances Nigeria’s position in the global energy market.

In February, Dangote began exporting oil products and started purchasing crude oil, mainly from the Nigerian National Petroleum Company (NNPC) Ltd, in December 2023.

The refinery’s successful entry into the Asian market is anticipated to drive further growth and establish new trade relationships, reinforcing its status as a key player in the global oil industry.

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This landmark export not only demonstrates Dangote Refinery’s operational capabilities but also signals Nigeria’s expanding influence in the global energy sector. As the refinery continues to innovate and expand, it is well-positioned to meet the increasing global demand for cleaner, more efficient fuels.

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From 1999 IPO to AI Titan: Nvidia’s 591,078% Return on Investment

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Nvidia Corp. has transformed from a fledgling chipmaker to the world’s most valuable company, boasting an astronomical total return of 591,078% since its initial public offering (IPO) in 1999.

This unparalleled growth underscores the company’s pivotal role in the technological revolution, particularly in the realms of graphics processing and artificial intelligence (AI).

Nvidia’s ascent to the top of the market culminated on Tuesday, as it unseated Microsoft Corp. to claim the title of the world’s most valuable company, with a market capitalization of $3.34 trillion.

The company, which debuted on the Nasdaq stock exchange at a modest valuation, has added over $2 trillion to its market cap this year alone, driven by surging demand for its cutting-edge AI chips.

The Early Years: Laying the Foundation

When Nvidia launched its IPO in 1999, the tech landscape was vastly different. Intel dominated semiconductors, and Nvidia was a relatively unknown entity.

However, the company’s strategic focus on developing advanced graphics processing units (GPUs) quickly set it apart. By securing deals to supply GPUs for popular video-game consoles like Microsoft’s Xbox and Sony’s PlayStation, Nvidia established itself as a key player in the gaming industry.

Overcoming Challenges: Litigation and Competition

The path to success was not without obstacles. In the early 2000s, Nvidia faced significant challenges, including a major legal dispute with Intel that temporarily pushed it out of a crucial market segment. The stock also endured three separate annual declines of over 50%, testing the resolve of its investors.

However, Nvidia’s commitment to innovation and strategic foresight kept it moving forward. In 2012, the company introduced graphics chips for servers in data centers, opening a new and lucrative market. Although initial sales were slow, this move laid the groundwork for future growth in high-performance computing.

The AI Revolution: A New Era of Growth

Nvidia’s fortunes took a dramatic turn with the advent of AI. The company’s GPUs, initially designed for rendering video game graphics, proved to be exceptionally well-suited for the parallel processing tasks required in AI and machine learning. This versatility positioned Nvidia as a leader in the AI hardware market.

The release of OpenAI’s ChatGPT in late 2022 was a pivotal moment. As interest in AI applications skyrocketed, so did the demand for Nvidia’s chips. The company’s revenue from data centers, driven by AI-related sales, began to eclipse its traditional gaming revenue. By the first quarter of 2023, Nvidia’s earnings report revealed a jaw-dropping surge in sales, far exceeding Wall Street’s expectations.

A Test of Staying Power

Despite its meteoric rise, Nvidia faces ongoing challenges. Sustaining its current market position will require continued innovation and substantial investment in AI infrastructure. The company’s future success hinges on the broader adoption of AI technologies and the ability of its customers to generate significant returns on their investments in AI hardware.

Vision and Leadership: The Jensen Huang Effect

Much of Nvidia’s success can be attributed to the visionary leadership of co-founder and CEO Jensen Huang. His foresight in steering the company towards “accelerated computing” has been instrumental in Nvidia’s dominance. Under Huang’s guidance, Nvidia has consistently been at the forefront of technological advancements, catching every wave of innovation in hardware.

The Road Ahead

As Nvidia continues to navigate the complexities of the global tech market, its story serves as a testament to the power of strategic vision and innovation. With AI set to revolutionize industries from healthcare to automotive, Nvidia’s role as a key enabler of this transformation positions it for continued success.

Investors and analysts alike will be watching closely to see if Nvidia can maintain its lead in the fiercely competitive AI market. If its past performance is any indication, the future looks promising for this once-modest chipmaker turned AI titan.

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Dangote Group Expands Refinery Storage Capacity to 5.3 Billion Litres

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Dangote Refinery

The Dangote Group has announced a significant expansion of its refinery storage capacity.

The expansion, disclosed by Alhaji Aliko Dangote, President of the Dangote Group, during his address at the Afreximbank Annual Meetings and AfriCaribbean Trade & Investment Forum in Nassau, The Bahamas.

Currently boasting a storage capacity of 4.78 billion litres, the Dangote Petrochemical Refinery is set to increase this figure by an additional 600 million litres, bringing the total capacity to an impressive 5.3 billion litres.

This expansion underscores Dangote’s commitment to transforming Nigeria into a hub for refined petroleum products and solidifies the refinery’s role as a strategic reserve for the nation.

Addressing stakeholders at the forum, Dangote highlighted the refinery’s pivotal role in addressing longstanding challenges in Nigeria’s energy sector, particularly the absence of strategic reserves for petrol.

“The country doesn’t have strategic reserves in terms of petrol, which is very dangerous. But in our plant now, when you came, we had only 4.78 billion litres of various tankage capacity. But right now, we’re adding another 600 million,” Dangote affirmed.

The expansion comes amidst various operational challenges faced by the refinery, including attempts by international oil companies to hinder its operations.

Dangote asserted that these challenges, aimed at impeding the success of the refinery, were indicative of broader resistance to change within the oil industry.

“We borrowed the money based on our balance sheet. I think we borrowed just over $5.5bn. But we paid also a lot of interest as we went along, because the project was delayed because of a lack of land, also the sand-filling took a long time,” Dangote revealed, emphasizing the resilience required to overcome these obstacles.

Moreover, Dangote expressed optimism regarding the refinery’s capacity to influence regional fuel prices, citing the success story of diesel price reduction following the refinery’s market entry.

He indicated that while petrol pricing remains a complex issue governed by governmental policies, the refinery’s operations would strive to offer competitive pricing and supply stability.

The expansion of the Dangote Petrochemical Refinery not only marks a significant milestone in Nigeria’s industrial landscape but also positions the conglomerate as a key player in reshaping Africa’s energy dynamics.

As construction progresses towards completion, the refinery aims to further consolidate its role in meeting regional energy demands and fostering economic growth across West Africa.

With plans to commence sales of refined products in the coming months, Dangote’s refinery is poised to play a transformative role in Nigeria’s quest for energy independence and regional economic integration.

As stakeholders await the refinery’s operational debut, expectations are high for its potential to drive down fuel prices and enhance energy security across the region.

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