Connect with us

Economy

Deregulate Power Sector, Don Urges FG

Published

on

Power - Investors King
  • Deregulate Power Sector, Don Urges FG

A Professor of Economics, Sheriffdeen Tella, has called on the Federal Government to deregulate the power sector as opposed to the current privatisation regime in the sector.

He made this call on Wednesday while fielding questions when he featured at The PUNCH Forum held at the PUNCH Place, Magboro, Ogun State.

The don likened the current regime of privatisation as “just putting money in some people’s hands.”

The sector was privatised by the President Goodluck Jonathan administration with 11 electricity distribution companies and six generation companies handed over to core investors on November 1, 2013.

The Transmission Company of Nigeria, which manages the national grid, is still fully owned and operated by the government.

On July 2015, the Federal Government took over Yola Electricity Distribution Company following the exit of the core investor.

Tella advised that by deregulating the power sector just as it did in the telecommunications sector, private investors would be able to generate power and sell to whoever could buy it.

He said, “The government should deregulate the power sector, just like it did with the telecommunications sector. Individuals should be allowed to generate power and distribute to the people and industries. The current privatisation is just like putting money in some people’s hands.”

The don, who is a former Vice-Chancellor of the Crescent University, Abeokuta, equally attributed the slow pace of economic development in the country to a lack of long-term national plan by successive administrations.

The don, who further noted that skewed federalism being operated in the country had denied it economic prosperity and progress, added that though past administrations had come up with one plan or the other, they had not really made any meaningful and enduring impact on the nation and Nigerians.

He said, “We have had governments both military and civilians that came up with different plans viz Vision 2010, Vision 20: 2020, NEEDS (National Economic Empowerment and Development Strategy), 7-Point Agenda, and Transformation Agenda, among others. They did not endure and each fizzled out after each administration. What we need is a long-term national plan.

“There is a report that by 2050, Nigeria’s current population will double. What are the plans we are making to address this? I don’t think there is anything on the ground in terms of a national plan.

“We have to have a long- term prospect of the economy. By this, I mean there must be a national plan and a state plan to direct the nation’s economic and political lives.”

He said that a nation that enjoyed economic prosperity must have “an economy where employment opportunities are available, national income and per capita income are rising, inflation is low, goods are available due to growing domestic production, people are taking holiday abroad, social amenities for young and old are of good quality and affordable, and life expectancy is high.”

Listing other barriers to the nation’s growth and economic prosperity, he noted that these included the political structure of the country, insincerity of politicians, and political expediency over economic judgement.

Tella, who is of the Department of Economics, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago Iwoye, Ogun State, said for Nigeria to experience industrial development, it must invest massively in education.

He said, “Massive qualitative education is necessary for economic prosperity. When people are educated they become creative. When one is educated, he knows he has to have a number of children he can cater for.”

Tella, also noted that industries needed a constant power supply to produce optimally.

Tella, who added that the nation’s democracy was maturing, however, called on the media and the elite to act as checks on the excesses of the politicians.

He said, “The elite and the media must insist on accountability, fairness and justice. The elite must get out of their comfort zone and fight for the poor for the benefit of Nigeria.”

CEO/Founder Investors King Ltd, a foreign exchange research analyst, contributing author on New York-based Talk Markets and Investing.com, with over a decade experience in the global financial markets.

Economy

British Petrol Stations Run Dry as Truck Driver Shortage Disrupts Supply Chain

Published

on

Petrol - Investors King

Gas station pumps ran dry in major British cities on Monday and vendors rationed sales as a shortage of truckers strained supply chains to breaking point in the world’s fifth-largest economy.

A dire post-Brexit shortage of lorry drivers revealed as the COVID-19 pandemic eases has sown chaos through British supply chains in everything from food to fuel, raising the spectre of disruptions and price rises in the run up to Christmas.

Drivers queued for hours to fill their cars at gas stations that were still serving fuel, albeit often rationed, and there were calls for National Health Service (NHS) workers to be given priority, to keep hospitals open as the pandemic continues.

“As pumps run dry there is a real risk that NHS staff won’t be able to do their jobs, and provide vital services and care to people who urgently need it,” said Dr Chaand Nagpaul, the British Medical Association’s council chair.

Pumps across British cities were either closed or had signs saying fuel was unavailable on Monday, Reuters reporters said, with some limiting the amount of fuel each customer could buy.

The Petrol Retailers Association (PRA), which represents independent fuel retailers which now account for 65% of all UK forecourts, said members had reported that 50% to 90% of pumps were dry in some areas.

“We need some calm,” Gordon Balmer, executive director of the PRA, who worked for BP (BP.L) for 30 years, told Reuters. “Please don’t panic buy: if people drain the network then it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.”

Royal Dutch Shell (RDSa.L) said it had seen higher than usual demand for fuel across its British network and that some sites were running low on some grades of fuel.

Environment Secretary George Eustice said there was no shortage of fuel, urged people to stop panic buying and said there were no plans to get the army to drive trucks, though the Ministry of Defence would help with trucker testing.

Hauliers, gas stations and retailers warned that there were no quick fixes, however, as the shortfall of truck drivers – estimated to be around 100,000 – was so acute, and because transporting fuel demands additional training and licensing.

BREXIT CRUNCH?

For months, supermarkets, processors and farmers have warned that a shortage of heavy goods vehicle (HGV) drivers was straining supply chains to breaking point – making it harder to get goods onto shelves.

Amid warnings of a dire winter ahead, some politicians in the European Union linked the supply chain stress to the 2016 Brexit referendum and Britain’s subsequent decision to seek a distant relationship with the bloc.

“The free movement of labour is part of the European Union, and we tried very hard to convince the British not to leave the Union,” said Olaf Scholz, the Social Democrat candidate to succeed Angela Merkel as German chancellor.

“They decided differently. I hope they will manage the problems coming from that,” Scholz said.

British ministers have insisted that Brexit is nothing to do with the current trucker shortage, though around 25,000 truckers returned to Europe before Brexit. Britain was also unable to test 40,000 drivers during COVID-19 lockdowns.

The government on Sunday announced a plan to issue temporary visas for 5,000 foreign truck drivers.

Edwin Atema, the head of research and enforcement at the Netherlands-based FNV union, told the BBC that EU drivers were unlikely to flock to Britain given the conditions on offer.

“The EU workers we speak to will not go to the UK for a short-term visa to help UK out of the shit they created themselves,” Atema said.

Continue Reading

Economy

Africa Needs $2 Trillion for Green Manufacturing, McKinsey Says

Published

on

robo - Investors King

Africa’s lack of industrial development puts it in a strong position to develop low-carbon manufacturing without the costs of transitioning from fossil fuel-based factories, McKinsey & Co. said.

In the process of striving toward net-zero emissions by 2050, the continent could create a net 3.8 million jobs, McKinsey said in its Africa’s Green Manufacturing Crossroads report, which was partially funded by the U.K. government and released Monday. However, to hit that level would require investment of $2 trillion in manufacturing and power.

“Africa has an opportunity to leapfrog high emitting manufacturing technologies and build a low-carbon manufacturing sector from the ground up,” Kartik Jayaram, a senior partner in McKinsey’s Nairobi office, said in a statement accompanying the report. “Africa could avoid future costs by sidestepping the expensive transition from fossil fuels to renewables.”

Still, without any commitments to decarbonize emissions from manufacturing, Africa could almost double to 830 megatons of carbon dioxide equivalent by 2050, McKinsey said.

“To change this trajectory, decisive action would be needed,” McKinsey said.

Of the 440 megatons of carbon dioxide equivalent currently produced by African manufacturing, almost a third comes from cement and 13% is emitted by coal-to-fuel plants, which are operated by Sasol Ltd. in South Africa, the consultancy said.

To fund the development, African countries would need to tap green finance instruments such as carbon credits, green bonds, green insurance and payment for performance linked to green outcomes, Mckinsey said.  To decarbonize existing industries, $600 billion would be needed while $1.4 trillion is needed for new green businesses, the consultancy said.

Carbon capture and storage and the production of green hydrogen are two technologies that could help the continent attain the target, it said.

New industries that could be developed range from bioethanol and cross-laminated timber to electric vehicles and green hydrogen, McKinsey said.

Continue Reading

Economy

UNGA 2021: The World has the Resources to End Hunger, African Development Bank Head tells UN Food Systems Summit

Published

on

Akinwumi Adesina - Investors King

“The world has the resources to end hunger,” African Development Bank President Dr. Akinwumi A. Adesina said in a message on the first day of the United Nations Food Systems Summit.

Convened by UN Secretary General António Guterres, the event is billed by its organisers as “a historic opportunity to empower all people to leverage the power of food systems to drive our recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and get us back on track to achieve all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.”

The summit brings together thousands of youths, food producers, members of civil society, researchers, the private sector, women and indigenous people, all of whom are participating both physically and virtually in the summit. It is taking place on the sidelines of the 76th UN General Assembly in New York.

In his opening address, Guterres said the participants represented “energy, ideas and the willingness to create new partnerships,” and was a time to celebrate the dignity of those who produce and create the world’s food.

Decrying the 246 million people in Africa who go to bed daily without food and the continent’s 59 million stunted children as “morally and socially unacceptable,” Adesina said that delivering food security for Africa at greater scale called for prioritising technologies, climate and financing.

“The $33 billion per year required to free the world of hunger, is just 0.12% of $27 trillion that the world has deployed as stimulus to address the Covid-19 pandemic. I am confident that zero hunger can be achieved in Africa by 2030,“ Adesina said.

The African Development Bank’s Feed Africa Strategy, through its Technologies for African Agricultural Transformation program – widely known as TAAT – has provided 11 million farmers across 29 African countries with proven agricultural technologies for food security. Food production has expanded by 12 million metric tons while saving $814 million worth of food imports.

“We are well on our way to achieving our target of reaching 40 million farmers with modern and climate-resilient technologies in the next five years,” the African Development Bank chief added.

At a meeting on food security in Africa organized by the Bank and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) earlier this year, 19 African heads of state called for the establishment of a facility for financing food security and nutrition in Africa.

“The Facility for Financing Food Security and Nutrition in Africa should be capitalized with at least $ 1 billion per year,” Adesina said.

The welfare of the 70% of Africa’s population working in agriculture and agribusiness is a barometer of the state of the continent’s health.  “If they aren’t doing well, then Africa isn’t doing well,” Rwandan president Paul Kagame said in a message at the official opening.

The many other heads of state and government who spoke on Thursday included, Prime Minister Mario Draghi of Italy, President Felix Antoine Tshisekedi of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina of Bangladesh and Prime Minister Jacinda Arden of New Zealand.

Continue Reading




Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending