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Oil Firms Count Losses as Militants Worsen Woes

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Chevron

Chevron and Eni, two of the global oil majors operating in Nigeria, and their local counterparts such as Seplat and Oando may have been worst hit by the production disruptions occasioned by militant attacks in the Niger Delta, their financial results have shown.

Chevron Corporation, the second largest United States-based oil producer, lost $1.47bn in the second quarter of this year, its largest since 2001, compared with a net profit of $571m in the same period of 2015.

The company said last Friday that its worldwide net oil-equivalent production was 2.53 million barrels per day in the second quarter of 2016, compared with 2.60 million barrels per day a year ago.

It said, “Production increases from project ramp-ups in the United States, Angola, Canada and other areas were more than offset by normal field declines, the effect of asset sales, the Partitioned Zone shut-in, maintenance-related downtime, and the effects of civil unrest in Nigeria.”

Italian oil major, Eni, posted a net loss of €446m in the second quarter of 2016, as against a net profit of €498m in the same period of 2015.

Its oil and gas production fell by 2.2 per cent to 1.715 million barrels of oil equivalent per day, with liquids down by 5.6 per cent at 852,000 bpd.

The Chief Executive Officer, Eni, Claudio Descalzi, said the loss of Nigerian production over the period was 13,000 boepd, adding, “Hydrocarbon production beat expectations, offsetting the suspension of activity in Val d’Agri and the disruptions in Nigeria.”

Two other international oil companies in Nigeria, ExxonMobil Corporation and Royal Dutch Shell Plc, last week reported their lowest quarterly profits since 1999 and 2005, respectively.

Shell, which announced a 72 per cent drop in second-quarter earnings, said its liquids production available for sale in Nigeria plunged by 41 per cent in the second quarter of this year to 37,000 bpd.

Seplat Petroleum Development Company Plc, a major indigenous independent oil and gas company, recorded a net loss of $61m in the first half of the year, for the first time in its six years of operation.

The company said its average working interest production during the first six months was 25,695 boepd, compared to 32,580 boepd in 2015.

It said the reported production figures reflected the longer-than-expected suspension of oil production following the declaration of force majeure at the Forcados terminal by the operator, Shell Nigeria, on February 21 after the disruption in production and exports caused by a spill on the terminal subsea crude export pipeline.

The Chief Executive Officer, Seplat, Mr. Austin Avuru, said the first half results were heavily impacted by events outside of the company’s control.

He said, “The shut-in and suspension of oil exports at the Forcados terminal since mid-February mean we have faced significant challenges in the first half of the year. However, our underlying fundamentals remain strong and we continue to invest to grow our gas business at a rapid rate.”

Oando Plc announced on Tuesday that it made a loss-after-tax of N27bn in the first half of this year, compared to the N35bn lost a year ago.

The company said its daily production volumes dropped to about 45,000 boepd in the first half of this year from about 56,000 boepd in the same period of 2015 as a result of the operating challenges in the Niger Delta.

The Group Chief Executive, Oando, Mr. Wale Tinubu, said, “The first half of the year has attested to the deplorable state of security in the oil and gas environment in Nigeria, having experienced a 25 per cent decline in production volumes arising from the increased disruptions from militant activities.”

Is the CEO/Founder of Investors King Limited. A proven foreign exchange research analyst and a published author on Yahoo Finance, Businessinsider, Nasdaq, Entrepreneur.com, Investorplace, and many more. He has over two decades of experience in global financial markets.

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Shell Nigeria Boosts NDDC Funds with $142.5M Remittance in 2023

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Shell Petroleum Development of Nigeria Limited (SPDC) and Shell Nigeria Exploration and Production Company Limited (SNEPCo) significantly increased their contributions to the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) in 2023 as they remitted a total of $142.5 million.

This amount was an increase from the $79.77 million contributed in 2022.

In a statement released by Shell Nigeria’s Manager of Media Communications and NGO Relations, Bamidele Odugbesan, SPDC paid $112.5 million while SNEPCo remitted $30 million.

These contributions, made on behalf of Shell and its partners—including the Nigerian National Petroleum Company Limited (NNPC), TotalEnergies EP Nigeria Limited, NAOC, and Esso Exploration and Production Nigeria Limited—are statutory payments intended to support the NDDC’s developmental initiatives in the Niger Delta region.

Igo Weli, SPDC’s Director and Country Head of Corporate Relations, said “Our support for the NDDC aligns with our broader aspirations for regional development. This includes a wide array of social investments in health and education, which are crucial for the sustainable development of the communities where we operate.”

Shell Nigeria’s contributions are part of a long-standing tradition of community development programs that the company has supported since the 1960s.

These programs have had a significant impact on Nigerian society, with initiatives such as the Health-in-Motion programme providing free medical services to over one million individuals since its inception.

Also, Shell’s education support initiatives have awarded more than 3,450 secondary school grants, 3,772 university grants, and 1,062 cradle-to-career scholarship grants since 2016.

The company also highlighted the Shell LiveWIRE entrepreneurship programme, which has supported 73 businesses through training and mentorship, resulting in 97 new employment opportunities for Nigerians.

Odugbesan stated Shell’s ongoing commitment to its social responsibilities.

He said, “With the continuous support of our partners, we will persist in fulfilling our obligations to communities through statutory payments and various projects executed in collaboration with stakeholders”.

This increase in contributions comes on the heels of Shell Nigeria’s announcement of paying $1.09 billion in corporate taxes and royalties to the Nigerian government in 2023.

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Federal Government Unveils Plan to Boost Nigerian Automotive Industry with Local Manufacturing Drive

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In a bid to revitalize the Nigerian automotive industry and reduce dependency on imported auto parts, the Federal Government has unveiled an ambitious plan to kickstart local manufacturing initiatives.

Spearheaded by the Minister of Industry, Trade, and Investment, Doris Aniete, the initiative aims to stimulate growth in the sector by increasing the supply of locally produced components to the market by 40%.

Announcing the policy during a ministerial sectoral briefing to commemorate President Bola Tinubu’s first year in office, Aniete emphasized the importance of collaboration among manufacturers, dealers, regulatory bodies, and other stakeholders in the automotive ecosystem.

This collaborative effort, she stated, would be instrumental in addressing challenges, streamlining processes, and driving innovation within the industry.

For years, Nigeria has heavily relied on imports to meet the demand for vehicles and spare parts, with a significant portion of automotive components imported from abroad.

According to Luqman Mamudu, Chairman of the West Africa Automotive Show, Nigeria alone accounts for about 78.8% of automotive components imported to the region, amounting to approximately $4.2 billion annually out of the $6.2 billion spent by the region.

The newly developed framework aims to change this narrative by prioritizing the local production of critical automotive components such as tyres, batteries, brake pads, and more.

By fostering collaboration between stakeholders and incentivizing local manufacturing, the government seeks to create a more sustainable and self-reliant automotive industry.

Aniete highlighted the potential economic benefits of the initiative, citing significant foreign exchange savings through domestic production of parts.

She stressed that by reducing the need for imports, the country could conserve foreign exchange reserves and bolster its currency while simultaneously stimulating job creation and economic growth.

Furthermore, the government has attracted substantial investment capital amounting to $3.5 billion to develop a resurgence plan for the Nigerian Cotton, Textile, and Apparel Industry.

This initiative, undertaken in partnership with development partners and private sector players, aims to unlock the full potential of the sector and create additional opportunities for growth and employment.

In addition to these initiatives, the Ministry of Industry, Trade, and Investment disclosed plans to host the Lagos International Trade Fair, signaling a renewed commitment to reclaiming Nigeria’s position as a regional market powerhouse.

The revival of this trade fair, last hosted 14 years ago, is expected to amplify market linkages for manufacturers, suppliers, farmers, and traders nationwide, catalyzing economic activities across various sectors.

As transformative reforms unfold in the Nigerian automotive and textile industries, the government remains focused on unlocking equitable opportunities for farmers, miners, and entrepreneurs.

With stringent regulations and collaborative frameworks in place, Nigeria is poised to chart a new course towards sustainable economic development and self-reliance in key sectors.

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Dangote Oil Refinery Set for December Listing on Nigerian Stock Exchange

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Dangote Refinery

The $20 billion Dangote Oil Refinery is poised to be listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) by December 2024, according to statements made by Aliko Dangote, Chairman of the Dangote Group.

Dangote, Africa’s richest man, expressed his enthusiasm for involving Nigerians, Africans, and other investors in what he described as a historic move.

Speaking to The Africa Report, he affirmed, “The listing, most likely, I won’t be surprised if we list (on the Nigerian Stock Exchange) by the end of this year. We will do that.”

This listing, expected to attract significant investor interest, could potentially add about N8 trillion to N10 trillion to the market capitalisation of the Nigerian Stock Exchange, as predicted by economy and capital market analyst Rotimi Fakayejo.

He said such a listing would not only distribute wealth but also attract foreign portfolio investment to the country, bolstering the economy with additional foreign exchange.

Fakayejo further elaborated on the potential impact of the Dangote refinery listing, stating, “It is also going to engender foreign portfolio investment. Such listing will affect individuals in the country and the stocks listed on the Nigerian exchange.”

David Adonri, Vice President of Highcap Securities Limited, echoed this sentiment, highlighting the significance of the listing for the Nigerian capital market.

He said the listing would provide Nigerians with the opportunity to share in the considerable wealth generated by the refinery.

However, uncertainties loom regarding the Dangote refinery’s crude oil supply chain. While Dangote confirmed the refinery’s decision to import crude oil from the United States due to fluctuating Nigerian oil production figures, Minister of State for Petroleum (Oil), Heineken Lokpobiri, denied knowledge of such imports.

Despite this discrepancy, Dangote defended the decision, stating, “We have tendered to buy some WTI oil from the US because the size of our refinery is very big, and we have to make sure that we secure the raw materials for our production.”

With the refinery set to attain a capacity of 500,000 barrels per day by July and reach its full capacity of 650,000 barrels per day by the end of the year, expectations are high for its transformative impact on Nigeria’s energy sector and broader economy.

The impending listing of the Dangote Oil Refinery represents a significant milestone in Nigeria’s quest for economic growth and diversification.

As stakeholders eagerly await further developments, the prospect of increased market capitalisation and enhanced investor participation holds promise for the country’s economic future.

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