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Yield on 10-Year Japan Government Bond Falls Below Zero

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Bond

Yields on Japan’s benchmark 10-year government bond fell below zero for the first time, as investors clamor for safe-haven assets in the wake of a global market rout.

The yield on the 10-year Japan government bond (JGB) dropped as low as negative 0.007 percent. The fall came on the heels of a global stock market sell-off overnight that likely spurred safe haven flows back into Japan. Bond prices move inversely to yields.

The U.S. five-year Treasury yield also fell to around 1.1112 percent in Asia trading hours, its lowest since June 2013, when markets convulsed during the taper tantrum after the U.S. Federal Reserve first broached the idea that it would be tapering its quantitative easing program. The U.S. 10-year Treasury yield fell as low as levels around 1.6947 percent, a more than one-year low.

The 10-year JGB’s move to negative territory yield also follows the Bank of Japan’s (BOJ) move to a negative interest rate policy, which can make the return on JGBs, even at a negative yields, as well as the possibility of further price rises, more attractive comparatively.

Amid a surge in market volatility, “people want to hold government bonds” for the safe-haven play, said Chris Weston, chief market strategist at spreadbettor IG. “It’s not a nice time to be in risk assets at the moment.”

But he added that the rush into JGBs isn’t just about seeking safe havens.

“(Japan policymakers) have been aggressive on the wires, jawboning the currency and giving the impression there’ll be more (easing) coming from the BOJ,” he said. “There’s a large consensus for further action.”

Japan’s Finance Minister Taro Aso said Tuesday that the yen’s moves were “rough,” adding that he’ll be watching it closely, Reuters reported. The dollar was fetching as few as 114.22 yen in Asia trade Tuesday, dropping sharply — and quickly — from levels over 120 yen early last week. The yen is seeing inflows as it’s considered a safe-haven currency.

A stronger yen is a concern for Japan Inc., as it makes the country’s exports less competitive and dents company earnings when overseas revenue is translated back into the home currency.

The 10-year JGB’s move into negative yields had been expected ever since the BOJ adopted the negative rate policy.

Deutsche Bank last week forecast 10-year JGB to trade in a range of negative 0.05 to positive 0.15 percent for the time being. Capital Economics tips the bond yield to fall to negative 0.25 percent by the end of 2016.

Yields on shorter-dated bonds were already negative in Japan, as well as in many countries in the euro zone, where the European Central Bank has flooded financial markets with cash. Nearly 70 percent of the JGBs in the market already offer negative yields, the Nikkei Asian Review reported last week.

However, a yield below zero on 10-year bonds is rare. Switzerland 10-year bonds currently yield around negative 0.335 percent, although the country’s bond market is smaller than Japan’s.

A negative yield on a bond – which means investors are effectively paying for the privilege of lending Japan’s government money – suggests continued strong demand for JGBs.

The latest driver for the rally in bond prices (and the decline in yields) was the January 29 move by the BOJ to adopt negative interest rates for the first time. The central bank said it would apply a rate of negative 0.1 percent to excess reserves that financial institutional held with it, effective February 16.

That nontraditional policy change may also be unsettling markets.

“I think that central banks are re-writing the Econ textbook. The problem is its unclear how this story ends, but history would suggest this is not a sustainable trend,” said hedge fund manager Brian Kelly of BKCM LLC.

—By CNBC.Com’s Leslie Shaffer; Follow her on Twitter @LeslieShaffer1

Is the CEO/Founder of Investors King Limited. A proven foreign exchange research analyst and a published author on Yahoo Finance, Nasdaq, Entrepreneur.com, Investorplace, and many more. He has over two decades of experience in global financial markets.

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Flashing Green

Oil prices have rebounded strongly over the last few days – up around 10% from the lows – buoyed by the prospect of a lower price cap on Russian crude

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Traders Wall Street

By Craig Erlam, Senior Market Analyst, UK & EMEA, OANDA

We’re seeing green flashing across the board on Thursday, with sentiment buoyed by positive signals on Fed rate hikes and China’s Covid response.

While it could be argued that Jerome Powell’s comments on Wednesday were relatively balanced – slower tightening now but rates high for longer – the last year has proven that anticipating the path of inflation even a short period ahead is incredibly difficult. Knowing what the Fed intends to do next is far more valuable than what it thinks it may do 6-12 months down the line.

And anything that is perceived to reduce to possibility of an interest rate recession is going to be a positive for equity markets. The Fed has every opportunity to tighten more in the months ahead if the data doesn’t play ball. What’s far more difficult is undoing the damage caused by moving too fast now with little to no visibility on how impactful past tightening has been.

Positive signals

The signals coming from China also look very positive. While we shouldn’t expect a dramatic shift in policy from the leadership, particularly before the March Congress, any modest softening in its Covid-zero policy will and should be welcomed. The approach has been extremely damaging to growth and confidence and the protests highlight how public opinion towards it is changing.

We shouldn’t be naive to the fact that a move away from the policy won’t be easy and there’ll be plenty of setbacks. But it’s certainly a step in the right direction that, along with the measures announced to revive the property market, could put the economy on a much better path.

A huge few days for oil markets

Oil prices have rebounded strongly over the last few days – up around 10% from the lows – buoyed by the prospect of a lower price cap on Russian crude, another large production cut from OPEC+ this weekend, and China’s evolving Covid stance. There remains considerable uncertainty surrounding all of the above though which will likely ensure prices remain volatile going into the weekend. That could carry more risk than normal if the OPEC+ meeting does go ahead as planned on Sunday and the EU hasn’t agreed to the price cap level by the close of play Friday. The range of possibilities on these two things alone is huge which will make rumours and speculation over the coming day or two all the more impactful.

Gold testing range highs

Gold bulls were particularly happy with Powell’s comments on Wednesday with the yellow metal rallying strongly to trade at the upper end of its recent range. It faces strong resistance around $1,780 though which was a significant level of support in the first half of the year. With so much data to come over the next day or so, it may not prove particularly resilient if traders are given further hope that rates will rise more slowly and peak lower.

Some relief for cryptos

The risk relief rally is coming at just the right time for bitcoin, helping it to recover from the lows to trade around $17,000. This is around the highs of the last few weeks since it settled after its latest plunge. Whether it will be enough to revive interest in the cryptocurrency, I’m not sure. The FTX fallout is continuing to weigh heavily on the space and the prospect of more contagion or scandals is hard to ignore.

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Crude Oil

Oil Revenue into Foreign Reserve Dropped From $3bn Monthly in 2014 to Zero in 2022

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Oil

The official foreign exchange receipt from crude oil sales into Nigeria’s official reserves has dried up steadily from above US$3.0 billion monthly in 2014 to an absolute zero dollar today, the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) governor, Godwin Emefiele disclosed.

Speaking at the 57th annual bankers’ dinner organized by the Chartered Institute of bankers of Nigeria (CIBN) in Lagos, the CBN governor noted that there has been a significant loss in foreign reserves due to the naira’s struggle and the rise in demand for forex. 

He added that the sharp increase in the number of Nigerians who are seeking education in foreign countries particularly the UK has resulted in an unprecedented demand for foreign exchange. 

According to him, the number of student visas issued to Nigerians by the UK alone has increased from an annual average of about 8,000 visas as of 2020 to nearly 66,000 in 2022.

Emefiele also lamented about the level of crude oil theft in Nigeria which has significantly affected the country’s oil production. He noted that crude oil theft has adversely impacted the Country’s foreign exchange reserves.

Investors King had earlier reported that Nigeria has lost its coveted position as Africa’s largest oil producer after oil production dropped below the mark of 1 million barrels per day. 

Nigeria currently trails Angola, Libya and Algeria to the fourth position. 

Meanwhile, on the Naira-4-Dollar scheme which the CBN introduced to boost migrant remittances into the Nigerian economy, the CBN governor noted that the scheme has largely been successful. 

“I am happy to note that, so far, the Naira-for-Dollar scheme has been successful in increasing remittance inflows through our registered International Money Transfer Organisation (IMTOs),” he said.

Emefiele also noted that the introduction of the National Domestic Card Scheme (NDCS) will help to reduce the operating cost incurred by commercial banks while using foreign cards. 

It could be recalled that the CBN earlier announced that it planned to introduce Nigeria-made transactional cards to replace well-known cards such as Visa and MasterCard.

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Crude Oil

Crude Oil Gained 2% as U.S. Oil Inventories Dipped Last Week

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Crude Oil - Investors King

Crude oil appreciated on Tuesday on signs global supply is declining amid better-than-expected optimism on Chinese economic recovery and a weaker dollar.

But the likelihood that OPEC+ will leave output unchanged at its upcoming meeting limited the gains.

Brent crude futures rose $2.06, or 2.48% to $85.09 per barrel by 1044 GMT. The more active February Brent crude contract rose by 2.02% to $85.95.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures climbed $1.69, or 2.16%, to $79.89.

Support followed expectations of tighter crude supply.

U.S. crude oil stocks dropped by 7.9 million barrels in the week ended Nov. 25, according to market sources citing American Petroleum Institute figures on Tuesday.

Official figures are due from the U.S Energy Information Administration on Wednesday.

And the International Energy Agency expects Russian crude production to be curtailed by some 2 million barrels of oil per day by the end of the first quarter next year, its chief Fatih Birol told Reuters on Tuesday.

On the demand side, further support came from optimism over a demand recovery in China, the world’s largest crude buyer.

China reported fewer COVID-19 infections than on Tuesday, while the market speculated that weekend protests could prompt an easing in travel restrictions.

Guangzhou, a southern city, relaxed COVID prevention rules in several districts on Wednesday.

A fall in the U.S. dollar was also bearish for prices. A weaker greenback makes dollar-denominated oil contracts cheaper for holders of other currencies, and boosts demand.

Fed Chair Jerome Powell is scheduled to speak about the economy and labour market on Wednesday, with investors looking for clues about when the Fed will slow the pace of its aggressive interest rate hikes.

Capping gains, the OPEC+ decision to hold its Dec. 4 meeting virtually signals little likelihood of a policy change, a source with direct knowledge of the matter told Reuters on Wednesday.

“Market fundamentals favour another cut, especially given the uncertainty over China’s COVID situation … Failure to do so risks sparking another selling frenzy,” said Stephen Brennock of oil broker PVM.

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