Connect with us

Social Media

TikTok Partners With ThinkWiFi To Launch free Wifi’ hotspots In Communities In South Africa

TikTok has partnered with a South African company Think WiFi, a free public WiFi company, to launch 50 free WiFi hotspots spread across different communities in South Africa

Published

on

TikTok 1

It is reported that Africa has the lowest number of internet connections, with only 22 percent of the continent having access to the internet.

As part of its commitment to empowering local communities to ensure they have adequate access to internet connectivity, social media platform, TikTok has partnered with a South African company Think WiFi, a free public WiFi company, to launch 50 free WiFi hotspots spread across different communities in South Africa.

According to TikTok, this move was inspired by the need to drive awareness and advocacy relating to the digital divide & the need for digital literacy inclusion for all communities in the country.

“This is a move by the entertainment platform to drive awareness and advocacy relating to the digital divide and the need for digital literacy inclusion for all communities,” a statement on the initiative said.

The launch of the pilot coincides with World Literacy Day and its theme of “Transforming Literacy Learning Spaces”, focusing on the stagnant growth in Internet penetration.

TikTok’s director for government relations and public policy in Sub-Saharan Africa, Fortune Mgwili-Sibanda via a statement disclosed that the company understands that the social media platform plays an important role in the digital world, hence the reason for the company’s motive.

The statement reads;

“We understand that as an entertainment platform accessible on mobile devices, TikTok plays an important role in the digital world.

“With this pilot, we hope to encourage more people to join digital spaces such as ours, to not only create content but to learn new skills and educate fellow community members about their passion and interests.”

ThinkWiFi CEO Janine Rebelo disclosed that the Internet offered “endless” opportunities for South Africa’s youth, but many did not have access to digital hardware, digital literacy skills, or connectivity.

“The latter reality is exacerbated by the high cost of data and the limited availability of infrastructure to support broadband penetration targets,” Rebelo stated.

Continue Reading
Comments

Social Media

Video Sharing App TikTok Fined $29 M in The U.K For Breaching Children’s Privacy

TikTok faces a $29 million fine in the U.K after an investigation by the British Government showed that the social media app breached the U.K data protection laws and failed to protect children’s privacy

Published

on

tiktok valuation

Video sharing app TikTok faces a $29 million fine in the U.K after an investigation by the British Government discovered that the social media app breached the U.K data protection laws and failed to protect children’s privacy.

According to the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), a notice of intent was issued to TikTok and TikTok Information Technologies UK entity, alleging that the social media app breached British rules between May 2018 and July 2020. A notice of intent precedes a potential fine from the regulator.

ICO also explained that TikTok “may have” processed data of children under the age of 13 without parental consent. Additionally, it stated that the company may have failed to provide proper information to its users in a concise, transparent, and easily understood way and processed special category data, without legal grounds to do so.

Special category data refers to sensitive personal data in areas such as sexual orientation, religious beliefs, ethnic and racial origin, political opinions, and genetic and biometric data.

The information commissioner John Edwards while addressing TikTok’s breach of Children’s data protection laws said,

“We all want children to be able to learn and experience the digital world, but with proper data privacy protections.

“Companies providing digital services have a legal duty to put those protections in place, but our provisional view is that TikTok fell short of meeting that requirement.

Edwards also indicated the ICO plans to take enforcement action against other companies. 

“We are currently looking into how over 50 different online services are conforming with the Children’s Code and have six ongoing investigations looking into companies providing digital services who haven’t, in our initial view, taken their responsibilities around child safety seriously enough,”

The UK “Children’s Code,” also known as the age-appropriate design code, seeks to create a safer internet for children by enforcing 15 standards that apps and online services need to follow.

It specifically targets Big Tech names including Meta, YouTube, and TikTok, and is applied to any companies, including those outside the UK, that process personal data of British kids.

Continue Reading

Social Media

Meta Partners With NAPTIP, Launches ‘AMBER Alert’ to Enable Faster Response Finding Missing Children

Meta has partnered with the National Agency For The Prohibition Of Trafficking In Persons (NAPTIP) to launch the ‘AMBER Alert’ program in Nigeria

Published

on

Facebook Accelerator Programme - Investors King

Facebook parent company Meta has partnered with the National Agency For The Prohibition Of Trafficking In Persons (NAPTIP) to launch the ‘AMBER Alert’ program in Nigeria to enable faster response in finding missing children as well as enhancing investigation and rescue efforts.

AMBER Alert is an emergency response system that disseminates information about a missing person (usually a child), through media broadcasting or electronic roadway signs.

It also helps with information sharing on Facebook and Instagram whenever a child goes missing. The alerts will include important details about the missing child such as location, photo, description, and other available information that will be provided which can be shared with friends to enhance widespread publicity.

The AMBER Alert Programme was Launched on Facebook in 2015, and since then has assisted in numerous successful child endangerment cases in the US and around the world.

Speaking on the launch of the program in Nigeria, the Director General of the National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons (NAPTIP) Dr. Fatima Waziri-Azi said, “We are happy to be partnering with Meta to launch the AMBER Alert Programme on Facebook and Instagram to help ensure faster response in finding missing children.

“With these alerts, more people can be on the lookout for kids reported missing in their vicinity and report all leads to relevant authorities. NAPTIP cherishes every aspect of the intended collaboration and we are indeed glad to be on board with Meta to help find missing children in Nigeria.”

Also speaking at the launch event, Meta’s director of trust and safety, Emily Vacher said “The program is designed to include important information about the missing child such as a photo description, location of the abduction, and other relevant and available information to aid in immediately identifying the missing child.

“Already available across 28 countries globally, we are proud to partner with NAPTIP to make ‘Amber Alerts’ available in Nigeria — the second African country to join this program.

“When there is a reported case of a missing child, the most valuable thing one can do is share information as quickly as possible.

“By working with law enforcement in helping to share the right information with the right people, we hope that missing children will be safely reunited with their families faster.”

Following the launch of AMBER Alerts in Nigeria, Meta and NAPTIP will take out time to educate users on how to identify AMBER Alerts on their  Facebook and Instagram feeds, and also notify them on what to do when they see an alert.

Continue Reading

Social Media

Twitch to Prohibit Gambling Sites From Livestreaming on Its Platform

Twitch has revealed its plan to crack down on gambling sites that are not licensed in the United States, or possess any jurisdiction that provides sufficient consumer protection to stream on its platform.

Published

on

Twitch

Interactive live streaming service Twitch, has revealed its plan to crack down on gambling sites that are not licensed in the United States, or possess any jurisdiction that provides sufficient consumer protection to stream on its platform.

The ban which is reported to take effect on October 18th, was enforced after popular Twitch streamers threatened to stop streaming on the platform, which they took to Twitter with the hashtag #TwitchStopGambling which trended for some days.

Some streamers on the platform discussed a week-long boycott during the all-important holiday season, which is a peak period for ad sales on the platform.

Gambling is reported to have found a foothold on the platform where viewers watch streamers bet in cryptocurrency in online casinos. It is reported that users on Twitch watched about 244 million hours of gambling streams in the first half of 2022.

A popular streamer on the platform had admitted to using money borrowed from fellow streamers to fund a personal gambling addiction.

This confession is reported to have sparked a larger conversation about gambling streams on Twitch, which several online gambling companies use as a marketing tool to attract new users.

Millions of streamers on the platform called out the platform, stating that Gambling was causing a lot of damage to young Twitch users, which is bad for legitimate advertisers as it negatively impacts the quality of the whole site.

In a response to address the problem, Twitch issued a statement on Twitter where it stated the platfrom’s decision to update its policy on October 18th to prohibit unlicensed gambling sites.

Although, before the recent uproar as regards gambling on its platform, Twitch has been evaluating the presence of gambling streams for a while. It once banned affiliate and referral links to gambling sites in 2021.

However, the recent policy announcement does not mean Twitch is completely banning gambling, as sites offering slots and other games can still be streamed so long as they are licensed in the U.S.

In addition, Twitch clearly stated that “websites that focus on sports betting, fantasy sports, and poker” can still be streamed on the platform.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement




Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending