Connect with us

Forex

Foreign-Currency Shortages to Render Nigerian Banks Vulnerable -Moody’s

Published

on

recession

Forex Scarcity Renders Nigerian Banks Vulnerable

Nigeria’s banks to experience acute funding challenges as the drop in foreign currency deposits hit a record-low following COVID-19 pandemic disruption, stated Moody’s.

In a recent report titled ‘Renewed foreign-currency shortages highlight vulnerability for Nigerian banks‘ published by Moody’s Investors Service, a bond credit rating business of Moody’s Corporation, the drop in dollar deposits amid low oil revenue, volatile foreign investment and declined remittances from abroad due to COVID-19 pandemic are threatening to renew forex liquidity crisis of 2016-2017 on Nigerian banks.

“Lower dollar inflows at a time when foreign currency borrowing will likely be more expensive for Nigerian banks will strain their foreign currency funding, despite substantial improvements compared to 2016,” said Peter Mushangwe, Analyst at Moody’s.

“Our moderate scenario where foreign-currency deposits decline by 20%, while loans remain constant, would increase rated banks’ funding gap to NGN1.5 trillion [$3.8 billion], and to NGN1.9 trillion [$5.0 billion] under our severe-case scenario of 35% foreign-currency deposit contraction, creating acute funding challenges.”

According to Moody’s, oil and gas exports account for about 90 percent of Nigeria’s foreign currency revenue. However, with crude oil now trading at around $40 per barrel, far below its average of $65 per barrel in 2019 and $72 per barrel in 2018, Nigeria’s banks are expected to struggle to meet foreign-currency withdrawals in the next 12 to 18 months.

Moody’s said its rated “banks reduced their foreign currency funding gap to a combined NGN354 billion ($984 million) in 2019 from NGN1.436 trillion ($5.5 billion) in 2016. The ratio of foreign-currency loans to foreign-currency deposits at Moody’s rated banks dropped to 106% at the end of 2019 from 135% in 2016 as banks cut back on dollar loans while building up their dollar deposits.

“The smaller funding gap will enable the banks to better withstand unforeseen deposit withdrawals and likely higher borrowing costs. However, in the event of foreign currency deposits contracting by 20% or more, banks’ funding gaps will be significant.”

This further explained why the Nigerian Naira is trading at a record low of N461 against the United States dollar on the black market in recent weeks.

CEO/Founder Investors King Ltd, a foreign exchange research analyst, contributing author on New York-based Talk Markets and Investing.com, with over a decade experience in the global financial markets.

Naira

Naira Closed at N411.25 to US Dollar at NAFEX Window

Published

on

Naira Dollar Exchange Rate - Investors King

The Nigerian Naira declined further against the U.S Dollar on Tuesday ahead of the Ramadan holiday to trade at N411.25 to a single U.S Dollar at the Nigerian Autonomous Foreign Exchange (NAFEX) window.

The local currency plunged as low as N420.23 per dollar during the trading hours of Tuesday despite opening the day at N410.33/US$ before settling at N411.25 to a US dollar.

Investors on the window exchanged $98.33 million on Tuesday.

At the parallel section of the foreign exchange, Naira traded at N483 to a United States Dollar; N673 to a British Pound and N580 to a Euro.

Foreign exchange rates remained largely unchanged at the bureau de change section, with the Naira trading at N482 to a U.S Dollar; N674 to a British Pound and N584 to a Euro.

Several factors continue to weigh on the Nigerian Naira, especially with the foreign reserves hovering around record low and crude oil output not at an optimal level.

Other factors like rising inflation rate and drop in economic activity due to COVID-19 effect on the economy and lack of enough fiscal buffer to cushion the economy.

Continue Reading

Naira

Daily Naira Exchange Rates; Thursday, May 6, 2021

Published

on

Naira Exchange Rates - Investors King

Naira depreciated further at the parallel market on Thursday as the local currency traded at N485 to a United States Dollar. The Nigerian Naira exchanged at N676 to a British Pound and N585 to a Euro as shown below.

Naira Black Market Exchange Rates

Morning * Midday** Evening *** Final Rates

Date USD GBP EURO YUAN Canadian Australian
NGN BUY/SELL BUY/SELL BUY/SELL BUY/SELL BUY/SELL BUY/SELL
06/05/2021 480/485 665/676 575/585 62/69 395/405 292/320

Bureau De Change Naira Rates

Date

USD

GBP

EURO

NGN

BUY/SELL

BUY/SELL

BUY/SELL

06/05/2021

475/482

663/676

575/587

06/05/2021

475/482

663/676

575/587

Central Bank of Nigeria’s Official Naira Rates

Continue Reading

Forex

CBN Extends N5/$ Incentive Period to Boost Dollar Inflow

Published

on

Godwin Emefiele - Investors King

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has extended the N5 per US Dollar incentive on forex remittance indefinitely to boost liquidity and further deepen economic recovery.

The initiative was scheduled to end on May 8. It was introduced to encourage recipients of dollars to use formal banking channels and help the central bank capture such inflows to boost the stability of the local currency, which has been under pressure after oil prices plunged last year.

“We hereby announce the continuation of the scheme until further notice,” the regulator said in a statement on its website on Thursday.

The naira has been devalued three times since last year after a sharp drop in oil earnings, which accounts for 90% of foreign-exchange inflows, and remittances from workers abroad led to a dollar crunch in the West African nation, which produces the most crude in Africa. The local unit traded for 410.31 on the investors and exporters window, also called Nafex, as of 8:51 a.m. in Lagos.

Continue Reading

Trending