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N820bn Oil Revenue Under Threat as Exports Drop

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Silhouette of oil platform in sea against moody sky at sunset

The proposed oil revenue in the 2016 budget presented by President Muhammadu Buhari to the National Assembly about three weeks ago is facing a setback as the nation’s crude exports begin to fall amid further slide in global oil prices.

Industry analysts also say crude oil production in the country will continue its decline this year, meaning lower revenue for the government.

Nigeria, Africa’s top oil producer, relies on crude oil for most of its export earnings and government revenue.

Buhari had in the 2016 to 2018 Medium Term Expenditure Framework and Fiscal Strategy Paper sent to the National Assembly for this year’s budget said oil-related revenues were expected to contribute N820bn.

But the total exports of Nigerian crude oil are expected to slide in February after reaching a three-month high in January, Reuters reported, citing a compilation of loading programmes.

The export programme for Brass River crude, which was under force majeure, had not yet been issued as of Friday, leaving just 56 cargos for a total of 53 million barrels planned for February loading.

While a Brass River programme is expected once the force majeure is lifted, it will not enable February exports to reach the 61.7 million barrels initially planned for January.

The Atlantic Basin was said to be still oversupplied with oil and there were at least a dozen January loading Nigerian cargos looking for outlets.

The country’s output declined by 50,000 barrels per day in December due to disruptions to exports from the Brass River and Bonny production streams, a Reuters survey found out.

The President projected crude oil production of 2.2 million bpd and a benchmark price of $38 per barrel for this year’s budget, down from 2.2782 million bpd in 2015 budget.

The Head, Energy Research, Ecobank Capital, Mr. Dolapo Oni, who noted that the country’s oil production declined significantly last year, said, “Our production is really having issues, and I think it might be worse in 2016. Our production is likely to reduce this year.

“There are not as many fields likely to come on stream this year. Most companies just want to focus on their existing production. So, it is possible we won’t see as much new production come on stream to reverse the trend of decline in major fields we have. That might make production go down.”

He predicted that he nation’s oil production might fall to 1.9 million bpd on the average this year, compared to 2.2 million bpd and 2.1 million bpd in 2014 and 2015, respectively.

“This is worrisome for the government revenue because the budget is benchmarked on 2.2 million bpd production,” Oni said.

The global benchmark Brent crude on Wednesday dropped below $35 per barrel for the first time since July 2004 amid the ongoing row between key producers, Iran and Saudi Arabia, and after a sharp rise in United States’ gasoline inventories.

With the further slide on Wednesday, Brent was more than $3 per barrel lower than Nigeria’s proposed crude oil benchmark price for this year’s budget.

Brent fell to $34.52 per barrel from $36.42 per barrel the previous day amid growing global supply glut of crude.

The supply glut in the world oil market, which is said to be oversupplied to the tune of two million bpd, is expected to be exacerbated by the full return of Iran to the market after the expected lifting of Western sanctions.

There have been calls in some quarters for a downward review of the $38 per barrel oil benchmark price.

The Chairman, Trade Union Congress of Nigeria, Rivers State Chapter, Mr. Chika Onuegbu, said, “More worrisome is that some analysts, including the International Monetary Fund, have projected that crude oil will fall to $20 per barrel in 2016. Also, Goldman Sachs insists that the fall in crude oil price will be sustained and oil price will fall to $20 per barrel.

“Anyone who is a keen observer of the events that are shaping the crude oil price will recognise that we are in for a sustained low crude oil price regime. Accordingly, it is doubtful if the budgeted oil revenue of N820bn will be realised in 2016. If the budgeted oil revenue is not realised, this will negatively impact on the 2016 budget performance.

“It is, therefore, important that the government begins to make contingency arrangements should crude oil price fall below the benchmark price, or better still, review the benchmark oil price downwards.”

Punch

CEO/Founder Investors King Ltd, a foreign exchange research analyst, contributing author on New York-based Talk Markets and Investing.com, with over a decade experience in the global financial markets.

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Nestlé Nigeria: Maggi Supports Over 100,000 At Ramadan

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Maggi Ramadan- Investorsking

As has been its tradition in the past 10 years, Maggi supported over 100,000 households across Nigeria during the Ramadan season. From the start to the end of the season, the Maggi team was fully involved in providing healthy and nutritious food products for families at Sahur and Iftar.

Working with nutritionists and food enthusiasts, the brand also provided nutrition education to help them make healthy nutrition choices.

In the spirit of sharing and performing acts of service, the brand gave out to shoppers one million gift items through the Ramadan Shopper Promo starting from two weeks before Ramadan until the end of the season. Over 100,000 consumers were also given free food items: rice, vegetable oil, spaghetti and Maggi Seasoning, including donations to 160 charitable organizations and mosques, and door to door (Gida Gida) visits to 1,250 homes to share healthy food items.

To support healthy nutrition, it launched the Maggi Ramadan Diaries, a TV and radio programme that aired for all 30 days of the fast across multiple television stations, radio stations and online platforms. The cooking show provided tips on healthy lifestyles, shared knowledge about quick and delicious recipes and nutritious tips on Iftar and Sahur.

To round off the Eid celebrations, Nestlé Nigeria hosted consumers at a sumptuous dinner themed, ‘Maggi Food and Everything Else.’ Participants shared in a delicious Eid experience, with meals showcasing the best of Northern cuisine prepared by foremost chefs and food enthusiasts.

Speaking on Nestlé’s commitment to supporting individuals and families during Ramadan over the past ten years, Category Manager for Culinary, Nestlé Nigeria, Mrs. Nwando Ajene said, “Ramadan is a special season for renewed dedication to the values of service and sharing goodness; values which Maggi also firmly represents. Looking back on the past year, 2021 brings a fresh appreciation of the joy and privilege of coming together.

“Today, therefore, we want to share goodness with our consumers, stakeholders, and influencers who have been a part of this Maggi Ramadan experience over the past ten years. We are happy to have been a part of the Ramadan journey, and we will continue to support individuals and families to make healthier and tastier food choices every day.”

Jamilah Lawal, a Social Media Influencer had this to say about her experience; “Participating in ‘Maggi Dairies’ is an opportunity for me to share nutrition tips with countless people during Ramadan.
This year is special as we all recover from the impact of the pandemic. If there is anything we learned from 2020, it is the importance of healthy nutrition every day. Over the past years, I have seen the impact of improved nutrition on many families, and many more food enthusiasts have joined the campaign to promote healthier nutrition. I cannot thank Maggi enough for this platform which I will always support.”

MAGGI is an iconic brand from the stable of Nestlé, the good food, good life company committed to unlocking the power of food to enhance the quality of life for everyone today and for generations to come.

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Box Office Revenues Plunged by $30B in a Year, US Market The Hardest Hit

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BOX Office- Investorsking

The COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on the global film industry. With cinemas closed amid the lockdowns and millions of people practicing social distancing, ticket sales plunged to the lowest point in decades.

According to data presented by Stock Apps, global box office revenues amounted to $12bn in 2020, a catastrophic $30bn plunge in a year.

US Box Office Revenues Plunged by 80 percent in a Year

The COVID-19 hit came after the best year for the film industry in its history. In 2019, box office revenues hit $42.3bn, revealed the Motion Picture Association`s 2020 Theatrical and Home Entertainment report. In fact, this was a peak of impressive revenue growth that had been ongoing for over a decade.

However, cinema closures in 2020 caused a sharp decline in annual box office revenues, with the figure plunging by 71 percent year-over-year.

Statistics show that North America, as the world’s leading box office market for several decades, has been the hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2019, North American box office revenues amounted to $11.4bn, a slight drop from $11.9bn in 2018. After the pandemic struck, revenues plunged by 80 percent YoY to only $2.2bn in 2020.

Although the smallest of all regions in terms of box office revenues, the Latin American market witnessed almost identical revenue loss last year. Statistics show box office revenues in Latin American countries dipped by 81 percent in a year, falling from $2.8bn in 2019 to $500 million in 2020.

Asian Market Witnessed $11.8B Revenue Drop, EMEA Countries Lost $7B in Box Office Revenues Amid Pandemic

Over the years, Asian countries have started making their mark on the global movie industry. Bollywood movies, in particular, are gaining popularity outside of India. Still, while India’s film industry is releasing far more movies than China and the United States combined, its box office revenues are comparatively small.

Statistics show box office revenues in the Asia Pacific region grew steadily for the last decade, with the figure rising from $7.2bn in 2009 to $17.8bn in 2019. However, the closure of cinemas and theatres caused revenues to plunge by $11.8bn or 66 percent YoY in 2020.

EMEA countries lost around $7bn in box office revenues due to the pandemic. In 2019, cinemas across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa generated $10.3bn in ticket sales. Statistics show that last year, box office revenues plunged by 67 percent YoY to $3.3bn, one-third of pre-COVID-19 value.

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Dangote Cement Invests in New Line to Increase Supply, Reduce Price

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Dangote Cement - Investors King

Following the surge in the price of cement and demand, Dangote Cement Plc on Monday said it has invested in a new line at Obajana, Kogi State as well as in Okpella, Edo State and plans to reactivate its Gboko plant that has been shut for four years.

The leading manufacturer plans to rein in price and meet rising demand through an increase in supply.

Dangote Group’s new Chief Commercial Officer, Mr. Rabiu Umar, disclosed at a media briefing in Lagos.

Umar said: “There is a surge in demand immediately after COVID-19 disruption. This surge in demand is not a localised Nigerian phenomenon as a couple of countries around the world like Pakistan and Mexico, among others are seeing a rising incident of demand for cement.

“So the question is what is the Dangote Cement Plc doing to bring it down? First and foremost we have invested in a new line that has been completed in Obajana, which is waiting for the power plant for us to start bringing out more cement.

“We also have a new line in Okpella, Edo State, which is going to start operation very soon. Also we have restarted one of our plants in Gboko, Benue State that has not worked for almost four years all in a bid to make sure that there is enough production to supply the market.

He added: “What drives price is the interplay of the market forces of demand and supply. As a business, we have not increased our price. And the only way to deal with this upsurge is to have adequate capacity to supply the market by producing more to prevent a break in the supply chain that will lead to arbitrage.

“So, what we are trying to do is to ensure that we increase our supply of cement in the market and we believe that will help to manage the skyrocketing prices of cement.

“We have also stopped exporting cement to ensure that we meet local demand in spite of the fact that the foreign exchange from exports is very valuable in times like this.”

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