Connect with us

Economy

Nigeria’s Debt Burden to Hit N19.3tn by December

Published

on

naira
  • Nigeria’s Debt Burden to Hit N19.3tn by December

Analysts have cautioned the government against plunging the nation into another debt trap, even as there are plans to raise funds from external sources to finance critical infrastructure.

If the federal and state governments continue to rely heavily on debt instruments for the financing of the country’s infrastructure needs, then, Nigeria’s total debt burden will be hitting the N19tn mark by the end of this year.

Based on figures obtained from the Ministry of Budget and National Planning, the country’s total debt stock is expected to rise by N6.72tn this year from the 2016 figure of N12.58tn, making the total debt liability to rise to N19.3tn by the end of 2017.

The frequency of borrowing by the federal and state governments has become a source of worry to many analysts, who sound a note of caution that the country may be heading for another debt trap if restraint is not exercised.

According to the Economic Recovery and Growth Plan, Nigeria’s public debt has increased in recent years as the Federal Government has increased borrowing to finance budget deficits owing to declining revenue.

The country’s domestic debt profile is expected to rise by N2.34tn to N12.43tn this year from N10.09tn in 2016, while the foreign component is being projected to increase by N4.38tn from N2.48tn to N6.86tn.

The document stated that the focus of the government’s debt would be shifted from domestic borrowing to foreign sources, as loans from international financial institutions are cheaper and have longer repayment periods.

For instance, the ERGP stated that while the proportionate share of foreign financing would increase from the current level of about 28 per cent to almost 72 per cent in 2020, that of domestic financing would decrease gradually from about 54 per cent in 2016 to about 26 per cent by 2020.

The Federal Government is currently seeking $29.96bn in loans from the World Bank, African Development Bank and Japan International Cooperation Agency.

The other international financial agencies the government plans to borrow from are the Islamic Development Bank and China Exim Bank.

Some of the projects to be funded by the loans are the Mambila hydroelectric power, $4.8bn; railway modernisation (Calabar-Port Harcourt-Onne Deep Seaport segment), $3.5bn; Abuja mass rail transit project (phase two), $1.6bn; and Lagos-Kano railway modernisation project (Lagos-Ibadan segment, double track), $1.3bn.

The rest are Lagos-Kano railway modernisation project (Kano-Kaduna segment, double track) $1.1bn; ‘others’, $6bn; Eurobond, $4.5bn; Federal Government Budget Support, $3.5bn; social (education and health), $2.2bn; agriculture, $1.2bn; and economic management and statistics, $200m.

The Budget and National Planning ministry said with the shift in focus to more foreign borrowing, the domestic financing sector would be more available and accessible to the private sector, thus avoiding crowding out.

This, it added, would provide the private sector with a leading role to drive economic growth, create jobs and reduce the rate of poverty in the country.

The ministry noted that the projects that would be financed with external loans would be those that would support non-oil exports, and/or reduce import-dependence such that there would be no risk of external debt overhang.

Reacting to the development by the Federal Government, some financial analysts, who spoke to our correspondent, said borrowing might be a last resort by the government to survive its revenue challenges.

They said there was a need for the government to urgently begin a readjustment of its fiscal position in a way that would enable it generate more revenue from taxes.

The Director-General, Institute of Fiscal Studies of Nigeria, Mr. Godwin Ighedosa, said the expenditure of the government needed to be reduced in a manner that would reflect the rate of revenue decline.

He stated, “We have so much relied on oil revenue in the last 45 years and with the decline in oil revenue, time has come now for us to review our fiscal position.

“There is a need for reform of the country’s tax administration system to enable the Federal Government to raise more revenue from Capital Gains Tax. Our tax to Gross Domestic Product ratio is one of the lowest in the world and we need to address that.”

The Registrar, Chartered Institute of Finance and Control of Nigeria, Mr. Godwin Eohoi, said the need to get the economy back again might have influenced the decision for huge borrowing.

He stated that while borrowing in itself was not a bad economic strategy, the way in which such borrowing was being used was important.

Eohoi said, “I am not worried about borrowing because debt is a leverage, but it depends on what the loan is used for. It must be used for productive purposes and not to finance recurrent expenditure.

“Oil prices are just beginning to bounce back and so I see the borrowing as a last resort to prevent the total collapse of the economy since we had a serious revenue shortfall. When you have a decline in revenue, you have to resort to borrowing.”

CEO/Founder Investors King Ltd, a foreign exchange research analyst, contributing author on New York-based Talk Markets and Investing.com, with over a decade experience in the global financial markets.

Economy

Inflation Rate Increases Further in August to 13.22%

Published

on

consumers

Prices of Goods and Services Jump in Nigeria in August

Nigeria’s inflation rate rose further in the month of August to the highest since April 2018, according to the latest report from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS).

In the report released on Tuesday, the NBS said Consumer Price Index, which measures inflation rate, increase by 13.22 percent in the month under review.

This represents a 0.40 percent points increase from the 12.82 percent posted for the month of July.

On a monthly basis, consumer prices increased by 0.09 percent points from 1.25 per cent achieved in July to 1.34 percent in August 2020.

The report read in part, “The consumer price index, which measures inflation increased by 13.22 percent (year-on-year) in August 2020. This is 0.40 percent points higher than the rate recorded in July 2020 (12.82 percent).

“On a month-on-month basis, the headline index increased by 1.34 percent in August 2020. This is 0.09 per cent higher than the rate recorded in July 2020 (1.25 per cent).”

Rising costs continue to disrupt consumer spending in Africa’s largest economy, especially after President Muhammadu Buhari removed subsidy, up VAT from 5 percent to 7.5 percent and implemented service reflective electricity tariff during a tough period of global pandemic.

Despite majority of Nigerians saying the time is wrong, experts have said it was the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank that compelled the administration to up revenue generation in order to continue to service its debt and embark on necessary capital projects.

With the $3.4 billion loan secured from the IMF in May running out amid falling oil price and weak demand for the commodity, the Buhari led administration once again approached the World Bank for another loan of $1.5 billion to further cushion the negative impacts of COVID-19.

According to the people familiar with the process, the new loan is not receiving much attention from the multilateral financial institution as it insisted that some of the agreement reached with the International Monetary Fund before securing the $3.4 billion have not been implemented.

This, experts said was one of the main reasons the federal government made all the recent adjustments despite economic challenges and limitations.

The food index increase from 15.48 percent in July to 16 percent in the month of August, according to the statistics office.

“This rise in the food index was caused by increases in prices of bread and cereals, potatoes, yam and other tubers, meat, fish, fruits, oils and fats and vegetables,” it added.

The persistent increase in prices bolstered cost of living and plunged consumer spending in Africa’s largest economy due to broad-based layoffs and businesses shutting down operations for a safe haven.

Continue Reading

Economy

NNPC Says It Spent N41.98 Billion on Pipeline Repairs in Six Months

Published

on

pipleline vandalisation

NNPC Spends N41.98 Billion on Pipeline Repairs

The Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) has said it spent a total sum of N41.98 billion on pipeline repairs and management in the first six months of the year.

The corporation stated in its latest monthly oil report, saying “Products theft and vandalism have continued to destroy value and put NNPC at disadvantaged competitive position.”

It explained that a total of 1,067 pipeline points were vandalised between June 2019 and June 2020 with 33 of those vandalised in June 2020. That was 11 percent lower than the 37 points vandalised in the month of May.

The NNPC said, “Mosimi-Ibadan accounted for 33 per cent while ATC-Mosimi and Warri-River Niger recorded 27 per cent of the breaks each; other locations make up for the remaining 13 per cent.

“NNPC in collaboration with the local communities and other stakeholders continuously strive to reduce and eventually eliminate this menace.”

Further break down showed the NNPC spent N5.48 billion on pipeline repairs and management costs in the month of January 2020. In February, March, April, May and June of the same year, the corporation spent N6.74 billion; N7.69 billion; N7.84 billion; N7.99 billion and N6.24 billion, respectively.

The corporation also said the pipelines have aged over the years, therefore, giving rise to frequent failures and consequent operational downtimes.

“In addition, these facilities have aged over the years giving rise to frequent failures and consequent operational downtimes, high maintenance cost and revenue losses,” the NNPC added.

Continue Reading

Economy

Supporting Public Private Partnerships in Africa: African Development Bank Ready to Scale up

Published

on

Afdb

The African Development Bank Estimates Africa’s Infrastructure Financing Needs at up to $170bn a year by 2025

Representatives of the African Development Bank, governments, Development Finance Institutions, the private sector and professional associations joined a September 8 workshop to discuss how the Bank can strengthen support for Public Private Partnerships and channel greater investment toward economic and social infrastructure. The event, titled Designing the African Development Bank’s PPP Framework, was hosted virtually by the Bank.

The workshop took place against the backdrop of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing economic slowdown, which has sharpened an already urgent need for investment. Five African countries accounted for more than 50% of all successful PPP activity from 2008 to 2018: South Africa, Morocco, Nigeria, Egypt and Ghana. Several other countries have multiple PPPs in the pipeline– Burkina Faso has 20, and Botswana, 8.

“Before the COVID-19 pandemic, African infrastructure was already struggling to structure projects tailored for the private sector and at the same time achieving value for money for the public sector including affordability for users. It is therefore imperative that hybrid solutions such as PPPs must be seen and promoted as a way of building back better, stronger, greener, by clawing back private capital to infrastructure while creating much needed fiscal room for governments to address multiple other demands including building health systems’ resiliency.” Bank Vice President Solomon Quaynor said in his opening remarks.

The African Development Bank estimates Africa’s infrastructure financing needs at up to $170 billion a year by 2025, with an estimated financing gap of up to of $68 to $108 billion a year. PPPs are seen as a key element in narrowing this gap by crowding in private sector investment in infrastructure and African Development Bank is playing a critical role in scaling up that effort.

Amadou Oumarou, Director for the Bank’s Infrastructure and Urban Development department presented several rationales for the Bank’s effort to develop a PPP framework, including its Ten-Year Strategy (2013-2022) and a recommendation from the Bank’s Independent (IDEV) evaluation unit to scale up PPP interventions.

Webinar participants expressed a desire for the Bank to play an expanded role in supporting PPP development in Africa by strengthening policy and regulatory frameworks, building government capacity; project structuring and advisory services; and the provision of financing instruments such de-risking, guarantees, credit enhancements and local currency financing.

“Countries need to learn from each other’s achievements and mistakes, they need to have standard documents and checklists that will guide institutions in these countries through the PPP lifecycle,” said Shoubhik Ganguly of Rebel Group International, which is partnering with the Bank to develop the framework.

Mike Salawou, Division Manager; Infrastructure Partnerships, said “Policy dialogue is something the Bank places a lot of premium on, and that has proven to be very efficient in informing decision making.”

“One of the challenges RMCs are faced with is selecting the right project for implementation, therefore support should start from there, then going through to actual project preparation makes it a lot easier,” said Michael Opagi, Division Manager for Sub-Saharan Africa, IFC.

Private sector representatives praised DFIs as indispensable in securing financing for PPP projects in Africa. One example of a successful PPP project cited during the workshop is the Kigali Bulk Water project, which received significant backing from the African Development Bank, the World Bank, as well as private sector players.

According to Phillipe Valahu, CEO, PIDG the Kigali Water project is a perfect example of having an integrated support to a PPP project by using the three pillars proposed in the Bank’s PPP Framework. The project benefited from debt funding from PIDG alongside the African Development Bank which each provided $19 million of senior debt on commercial terms.

“The African Development Bank has unparalleled trust relationships with African governments, and we need to take advantage of that to speed up implementation of PPPS,” Quaynor said in closing.

Continue Reading

Trending