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Nigeria Earns $236bn From Petroleum Exports in Five Years

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Crude oil
  • Nigeria Earns $236bn From Petroleum Exports in Five Years

Nigeria, Africa’s top oil producer, earned a total of $236.15bn from petroleum exports over the last five years, a new report by the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries has shown.

OPEC, in its 2019 Annual Statistical Bulletin, put the value of Nigeria’s petroleum exports at $75.196bn in 2014; $41.168bn in 2015; $27.295bn in 2016; $37.983bn in 2017, and $54.513bn in 2018.

In 2018, the value of the country’s petroleum exports was the sixth biggest in the 14-member group, behind Saudi Arabia’s $194.358bn, UAE’s $74.94bn, Iraq’s $68.192bn, Iran’s $60.198bn and Kuwait’s $58.393bn.

The group said member countries’ economy indicators, including GDP growth and current account balance, continued to improve in 2018.

It said, “The population of OPEC member countries increased by almost 11 million last year, with Nigeria, Iraq and Angola adding 5.3 million, one million, 0.52 million inhabitants, respectively, thus bringing the OPEC MCs’ share of global population to 6.64 per cent (up from 6.57 per cent in 2017).

The report noted that member countries successfully continued to improve the diversification of their economies and be less dependent on petroleum export revenues.

It said, “The share of OPEC MCs petroleum export revenues to GDP has decreased by around six percentage points over the last five years. Declines have been registered in all OPEC MCs, as local governments commissioned a number of initiatives and programmes to promote the development of high value-added non-oil industries, including manufacturing and services.”

OPEC said the trend of diversification was also confirmed when analysing the share of non-petroleum export revenues to GDP at comparable oil price levels.

“Over the last four years (2015–18), this ratio has been between 78 per cent and 85 per cent, which is between 20 and 15 percentage points higher, as against the same ratio in years of comparable oil prices (2005, 2006, 2007 and 2009),” it added.

The year 2018 was said to have seen substantial global supply growth as total oil liquids production increased significantly by 2.60 million barrels per day, outpacing oil demand growth by more than one million bpd in 2018.

“The increase was once more driven by outstanding production gains in North America, particularly in the United States. In contrast, crude oil production from OPEC member countries, as well as from other non-OPEC countries, showed declines,” the group said.

In total, OPEC crude oil production showed a drop of around 400,000 bpd last year, compared to 2017, according to the report.

“With regard to countries with increasing oil production in 2018, output expansions were clearly driven by North America, notably by the United States. Oil supply in the US increased by around 2.3m bpd in the year 2018, representing almost 80 per cent of total non-OPEC supply growth,” OPEC said.

CEO/Founder Investors King Ltd, a foreign exchange research analyst, contributing author on New York-based Talk Markets and Investing.com, with over a decade long experience in the global financial market.

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Economy

Brent Crude Oil Maintains $43 Per Barrel Despite Surge in US Inventories

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Oil

Brent Crude Oil Sustains Upsurge Despite Rising US Inventories

Brent crude oil, against which Nigerian oil is priced, sustained its upsurge at $43 per barrel on Wednesday during the London trading session despite a report showing a build-up in the U.S. crude inventories in the week ended July 3, 2020.

Brent crude oil

According to the U.S Energy Information Administration (EIA) report released on Tuesday, crude oil production in the U.S is expected to decline by just 70,000 barrels per day from the 670,000 bpd previously predicted to 600,000 bpd.

While this was below the projected decline, it also points to a build-up in U.S stockpiles and suggested that oil production from the world’s largest economy may not decline as previously projected in 2020.

“The EIA’s forecast of a lower decline in U.S. output was partially offset by its outlook for firm demand recovery, which limited losses in oil markets,” Hiroyuki Kikukawa, general manager of research at Nissan Securities said.

“Still, expectations that the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and allies would taper oil output cuts from August and softer U.S. equities added to pressure,” he said.

The EIA projected that global oil demand will recover through the end of 2021 as demand was predicted to hit 101.1 million barrels per day in the fourth quarter of the year.

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Economy

Illegal Withdrawals: Rep To Investigate NNPC, NLNG Over $1.05bn

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House of representatives

Rep To Investigate NNPC, NLNG Over Illegal Withdrawal of $1.05bn from NLNG Account

The Nigerian House of Representatives has concluded plans to investigate illegal withdrawal of $1.05 billion from the account of the Nigerian Liquefied Natural Gas Limited (NLNG) by the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC).

The decision followed the adoption of a motion titled ‘Need to Investigate the Illegal Withdrawals from the NLNG Dividends Account by the Management of NNPC’ moved by the Minority Leader, Ndudi Elumelu, on Tuesday.

The House adopted the motion and mandated its Committee on Public Accounts to “invite the management of the NNPC as well as that of the NLNG, to conduct a thorough investigation on activities that have taken place on the dividends account and report back to the House in four weeks.”

Elumelu said, “The House is aware that the dividends from the NLNG are supposed to be paid into the Consolidated Revenue Funds account of the Federal Government and to be shared amongst the three tiers of government.

“The House is worried that the NNPC, which represents the government of Nigeria on the board of the NLNG, had unilaterally, without the required consultations with states and the mandatory appropriation from the National Assembly, illegally tampered with the funds at the NLNG dividends account to the tune of $1.05bn, thereby violating the nation’s appropriation law.

“The House is disturbed that there was no transparency in this extra-budgetary spending, as only the Group Managing Director and the corporation’s Chief Financial Officer had the knowledge of how the $1.05bn was spent.

“The House is concerned that there are no records showing the audit and recovery of accrued funds from the NLNG by the Office of the Auditor-General of the Federation, hence the need for a thorough investigation of the activities on the NLNG dividends account.”

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FG Gives Radio, Tv Stations Debt Relief, Writes Off 60 Percent Debt

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TSTV

FG Reduces Tv, Radio Stations Licence Fee by 30%, Writes Off 60% Debt

The Federal Government has reduced the existing licence fee paid by all open terrestrial radio and television stations by 30 percent.

The Minister of Information and Culture, Lai Mohammed, disclosed this at a press conference in Abuja on Monday.

He said the Federal Government has also decided to write off 60 percent of the N7 billion loan owed the government by television and radio stations.

He explained that the N7 billion is the total outstanding from television and radio stations on the renewal of their operating licences.

Mohammed, however, said for any station to benefit from the 60 percent debt relief, such a station must be ready and willing to pay the remaining 40 percent within the next three months.

According to him, the debt relief offer would open on July 10th and close on the 6th of October.

Mohammed said, “According to the NBC, many Nigerian radio and television stations remain indebted to the Federal Government to the tune of N7bn.

“Also, many of the stations are faced with the reality that their licences will not be renewed, in view of their indebtedness.

“Against this background, the management of the NBC has therefore recommended, and the Federal Government has accepted, the following measures to revamp the broadcast industry and to help reposition it for the challenges of business, post-COVID-19:

“(a) 60 per cent debt forgiveness for all debtor broadcast stations in the country; (b) the criterion for enjoying the debt forgiveness is for debtor stations to pay 40 per cent of their existing debt within the next three months.

“(c) Any station that is unable to pay the balance of 40 per cent indebtedness within the three-month window shall forfeit the opportunity to enjoy the stated debt forgiveness.

“(d) The existing license fee is further discounted by 30 per cent for all open terrestrial radio and television services effective July 10, 2020.

“(e) The debt forgiveness shall apply to functional licensed terrestrial radio and television stations only. (f) The debt forgiveness and discount shall not apply to pay TV service operators in Nigeria.”

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