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Five Nigerian Banks Support Customers with N6.6trn Loans in Six Months

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Recession bites

Five banks have boosted the businesses of their customers with N6.561trillion in the first six months of the year through loans and advances.

The amount of loans and advances is 21 per cent higher than the N5.435trillion given out by the same banks in the same period of the previous year. The five banks are FBN Holdings Plc, Union Bank of Nigeria Plc, Ecobank Transnational Incorporated, Sterling Bank Plc and FCMB Group Plc.

Given the headwinds in the economy that have increased the risk of debt repayment, banks were expected to reduce their exposure to their customers. However, THISDAY checks showed that instead of a reduction in level of lending, the five banks that have released their results for the half year ended June 30, 2016, increased their support in terms of loans and advances to customers.

Ecobank Transnational Incorporated that has operations across the African continental led with N2.856 trillion, up from N2.321trillion in 2015.

FBN Holdings Plc trailed with N2.111trillion, compared with N1.817trillion in 2015. FCMB Group Plc gave out loans and advances of N657 billion, up from N593billion the previous year, while Union Bank of Nigeria Plc boosted the businesses of its customers with N475billion in 2016, an improvement on the N366billion in 2015.

Sterling Bank Plc recorded loans and advances of N462billion, up from N338billion in 2015.
Market analysts said while the economic situation remains challenging, banks are strengthening their risk assessment strategies to ensure mitigation against those challenges.

For instance, FBN Holdings last week said it had continued to revamp its credit and risk management processes towards generating high quality assets and have begun to see improvements in this process operationally.

According to the Managing Director /CEO of First Bank, Dr. Adesola Adeduntan said, “Despite the 40 per cent devaluation impact on our risk assets, we have made progress with building stronger risk management architecture and strengthening the overall control environment. The economic slowdown has continued to constrain lending activities; however, as we overhaul our risk management processes, lending will be measured, very structured and controlled. We are focusing on growing transactions/activities of our existing customers as we keep leveraging our robust technology to provide digital banking and other innovative solutions to best serve our customers.”

Also speaking on the asset quality, Managing Director of Sterling Bank Plc, Mr. Yemi Adeola said: “The bank prioritised improvement in asset quality which was reflected by a 70 basis point decline in the non-performing loans and a 100 basis point reduction in cost of risk. Cost of funds also declined by 120 basis points to 4.7%. This was in spite of the foreign exchange liberalisation policy, the attendant liquidity squeeze and the rising inflation rate which peaked at 16.5 per cent in June 2016.”

CEO/Founder Investors King Ltd, a foreign exchange research analyst, contributing author on New York-based Talk Markets and Investing.com, with over a decade experience in the global financial markets.

Markets

Volkswagen Group, Toyota, and Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance Lost $104.5bn in Revenue in 2020

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Car Production at Toyota's Derbyshire Plant

Automakers Lost $104.5 Billion in Combined Revenue in H1 2020

Automakers had a rough start to 2020, with global auto production, and sales slumped amid the coronavirus outbreak. Supply chain disruptions, factory closures, and sales drops had a massive impact on the largest automobile manufactures, causing a sharp fall in their revenues.

According to data presented by StockApps, the Volkswagen Group, Toyota, and Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, as the leading automobile manufacturers based on global sales, lost $104.5bn in combined revenue in the first half of 2020.

Volkswagen Group Revenue Plunged by $34.5bn, the Biggest Drop in 2020

The world’s largest automobile manufacturer, the Volkswagen Group sold the most cars in 2019, delivering 10.2 million sedans, sport-utility vehicles, and compact cars under its top passenger car brands, and almost 734,000 trucks in its three commercial vehicle brands. Statista data also revealed the German automaker hit a 25.4% market share based on new car registrations in Europe as of October.

Although the company managed to reduce the effects of COVID-19 in the first half of the year, the H1 2020 financial report still revealed severe losses. Between January and June, the Group’s sales revenue plunged by $34.5bn to $114bn, the heaviest fall among the top three automakers.

The COVID-19 outbreak caused a 27% drop in vehicle deliveries and an adjusted operating loss of $940 million in the first half of 2020, down from an $11.8bn adjusted operating profit in the year-earlier period, forcing the German automaker to slash its dividend. The Yahoo Finance data also revealed the Volkswagen Group market cap dropped by 17% in 2020, falling from $98.1bn in December 2019 to $80.8bn last week.

Toyota Motor Corporation, the world’s second-largest car producer, sold 10.74 million vehicles in 2019. With 7.9 million cars sold between January and June, 100,000 more than VW Group, the company could become the leading automaker in 2020 if COVID-19 is contained in its most important markets, Japan and the United States.

In fiscal 2020, ended on March 31st, 2020, the Toyota sales revenue dropped by $2.9bn or 1.1% to $290bn. However, the Q1 FY 2021 results, for the period between April and June 2020, revealed a 40.4% drop in revenue and the smallest quarterly profit in nine years as the coronavirus pandemic halved its car sales. Statistics show the revenue of the Japanese automaker plunged by $29.7bn YoY in the second quarter of 2020, with a total loss in the first half of 2020 reaching $32.7bn.

The auto giant expects coronavirus to deliver a major blow to earnings and sales in the fiscal year ending March 2021, with net profit forecast to plunge 64% year-over-year to $6.97bn.

Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance Suffered a $37.3bn Loss

With 10 million vehicles sold in 2019 and 6.3 million in the first half of 2020, the Franco-Japanese Alliance, Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi, ranked third on the list of the top-selling car manufacturers.

Nevertheless, the COVID-19 outbreak severely affected their business. The Renault Group suffered a massive downturn for the first half of 2020. Between January and June, the company reported $21.8bn in sales revenue, a $12.5bn or 34% plunge year-over-year.

Sales figures were also down for the period, with the Renault Group suffering a 34.9% plunge globally and 41.8% in Europe, the second-worst hit region after the Americas. Nissan’s sales dropped by 47.7% globally and 33.7% in its home market of Japan.

Mitsubishi Motors reported a $12.6bn revenue loss in the fiscal year ended March 31st, 2020. The downturn continued in the Q1 of the fiscal year 2021, with revenues falling to $25.5bn, a 32% plunge year-over-year. The Japanese multinational automotive manufacturer suffered a total loss of $24.8bn in the first half of 2020, while its market cap halved reaching $2.98 bn last week.

Statistics show the Franco-Japanese Alliance lost a total of $37.3bn in sales revenue in the first half of 2020.

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Oil Steadies, But Outlook Gloomy as Coronavirus Cases, Supply Grow

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Oil price

Oil prices eked out small gains on Tuesday after sharp losses, but sentiment remained subdued as a surge in global coronavirus cases hit prospects for crude demand while supply is rising.

Brent crude was up 43 cents, or 1%, at $40.87 a barrel. U.S. oil gained 43 cents, or 1.1%, at $38.99 a barrel. Both contracts fell more than 3% on Monday.

A lack of progress on agreeing a U.S. coronavirus relief package added to market gloom, although U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Monday she hoped a deal can be reached before the Nov. 3 elections.

A wave of coronavirus infections sweeping across the United States, Russia, France and many other countries has undermined the global economic outlook, with record numbers of new cases forcing some countries to impose fresh restrictions as winter looms.

“We think demand from this point onwards is really going to struggle to grow. COVID-19 restrictions are all part of that,” said Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) commodities analyst Vivek Dhar.

CBA expects U.S. oil to average $38 and Brent to average $41 in the fourth quarter this year.

Prices got some support from a potential drop in U.S. production as oil companies began shutting offshore rigs with the approach of a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico.

Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said on Monday the worst is over for the crude market.

But his comment contradicted an earlier remark from OPEC’s secretary general, who said any oil market recovery may take longer than hoped as coronavirus infections rise around the world.

Meanwhile, Libyan production is expected to reach 1 million barrels per day (bpd) in the coming weeks, the country’s national oil company said on Friday, a quicker return than many analysts had predicted.

That is likely to complicate efforts by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to restrict output to offset weak demand.

OPEC+ – made up of OPEC and allies including Russia – is planning to increase production by 2 million bpd from the start of 2021 after record output cuts earlier this year.

An analyst survey by Reuters ahead of data from the American Petroleum Institute on Tuesday and the U.S. Energy Information Administration on Wednesday estimated that U.S. crude stocks rose in the week to Oct. 23, while gasoline and distillate inventories fell.

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Nigel Farage Urged to Highlight Perils of DIY Investing

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160624_INV_PoundBrexit

Nigel Farage appears to be advocating a DIY approach to investing – and this could be “monumentally risky” for inexperienced investors, warns the CEO of one of the world’s largest independent financial advisory and fintech organisations.

The warning from Nigel Green, chief executive and founder of deVere Group, comes as a daily finance-orientated newsletter from the team of the Brexit Party leader and political activist urges its readers to “tell us about your successes by going it alone – leaving the money men and middlemen by the side of the road…”

Mr Farage’s email is provided for correspondence.

Mr Green comments: “Successful DIY (Do It Yourself) investing can be possible, but for most people it is not recommended – indeed, it could be a costly and traumatic accident waiting to happen.

“Going it alone can be monumentally risky for inexperienced investors as the complexities involved can sink their portfolios.

“Perhaps this is why around two-thirds of wealthy individuals have a professional financial adviser of some sort, according to new independent research from the University of Toronto.”

He continues: “I would urge anyone who extols the virtues of a DIY approach to investing to also underscore the risks and potential pitfalls to be avoided.”

A pro will help you make the best investment decisions in five key ways, says Nigel Green.

“First, helping you to diversify a portfolio. Spreading money around is vital to curb risk. However, it must be used correctly – diversification will only add real value if the new asset has a different risk profile.

“Second, investing with a plan: Unless you have a sound plan, you’re gambling, not investing.

“Third, avoiding emotional decisions. Overly emotional decisions can prove deadly when it comes to investments because they are blighted by prejudices and biases.

“Fourth, regularly reviewing your portfolio: Investments need to be consistently reviewed to ensure they still deserve their place in the portfolio and that they are still on track to reach your long-term financial objectives.

“Fifth, not focusing excessively on historical returns: The future investment situation is likely to be different from time-aged averages.”

The deVere CEO concludes: “While investing remains almost universally regarded as one of the best ways to create, grow and safeguard wealth, considering the pitfalls of getting it wrong, it could be an expensive mistake for you and your family not to seek professional advice.”

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