Connect with us

Economy

Dow Sinks 390 Points in Global Selloff

Published

on

Dow

Stocks tumbled around the world, with U.S. equities sinking to their lowest levels since August, and bonds and gold jumped as oil’s plunge below $30 sent markets reeling. Treasuries extended gains as economic data and earnings added to concern that global growth is faltering.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank 391 points, European stocks fell into a bear market and the Shanghai Composite Index wiped out gains from an unprecedented state-rescue campaign as global equities added to the worst start to a year on record. Oil touched $29.28 a barrel before closing at a 12-year low. A measure of default risk for junk-rated U.S. companies surged to the highest in three years. Yields on 10-year Treasury notes dipped under 2 percent as doubts grow that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates. Gold surged the most in six weeks.

Crude’s drop to a 12-year low is sending shock waves around the world at the same time concern is mounting that China’s policy interventions will fall short of stoking growth in the world’s second-largest economy. Figures on retail sales and manufacturing Friday showed the U.S. economy ended the year on a weak note, and the start of 2016 wasn’t any better. Energy firms are laying off workers and currency markets from commodity-producing countries are in turmoil. The slump is also denting the outlook for inflation, causing traders to curb bets on how far the Fed will raise rates this year.

“Markets have to go through several stages and right now they’re just holding their head and crying,” Krishna Memani, chief investment officer at Oppenheimer Funds Inc. in New York, said by phone. “The drama and issue overnight is more related to oil prices not finding a floor. If it was just China and everything else was OK, we’d see through that. But when China is down and oil drops everyday, the market recognizes it has substantial issues.”

Adding to the unease, Intel Corp. dropped 9 percent after predicting first-quarter sales that fell short of some estimates. The semiconductor maker’s note of caution came at the start of an earnings season that may see U.S. profits fall faster than any time since the financial crisis.

Stocks

The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index plunged 2.2 percent at 4 p.m. in New York. The index fell as much as 3.3 percent before paring the slide in afternoon trading. It still capped a third weekly retreat and closed at the lowest level since Aug. 25, the day that marked the bottom of the summer selloff. U.S. equities markets are closed Monday for a federal holiday.

The gauge has lost 12 percent from its May record, leaving it well short of sliding into a bear market. It capped a third weekly decline, the longest slide since July. The Dow tumbled 2.463 points as none of its 30 members advanced, while small caps added to a bear market.

“There’s more uncertainty out of China, more uncertainty out of the Fed and then you have uncertainty about where the bottom is in oil prices. Markets abhor uncertainty,” said Quincy Krosby, a market strategist at Prudential Financial Inc., which oversees about $1.2 trillion. “The package of economic data this week certainly questions whether or not we are going to pull out of this. This is a lot deeper than what you’d see normally on a three-day weekend.”

Weakness in retail sales compounds concerns that momentum in consumer spending, which has been the backstop of U.S. growth prospects, is starting to fade. Meanwhile, a slowdown in China and other emerging markets has sent commodity prices lower and roiled stock markets around the world, exacerbating the plight of manufacturers who are being hit by an appreciating dollar.

The Stoxx Europe 600 Index retreated 2.8 percent, capping a weekly drop of 3.4 percent. Europe’s benchmark closed more than 20 percent from its record in April — meeting the common definition of a bear market.

Commodities

West Texas Intermediate crude fell as much as 6.2 percent, before settling 5.7 percent lower at $29.42 a barrel. Brent fell 5.9 percent to $29.05 a barrel. The discount on global benchmark Brent reached a five-year high as Iran moved closer to restoring exports.
While WTI sank 11 percent for the week, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. says crude will turn into a new bull market before the year is out as the price rout shuts down production, putting the U.S. shale-oil boom into reverse in the second half of the year. As U.S. production slumps by 575,000 barrels a day, global oil markets will tip from surplus to deficit, the bank said in a report.

Gold capped the biggest gain in six weeks as Chinese stocks retreated into a bear market and U.S. retail sales capped the weakest year since 2009, increasing demand for a haven. Platinum fell to a seven-year low. The metal has been whipsawed this week, after rallying to a two-month high last Friday. Futures for February delivery gained 1.6 percent to settle at $1,090.70 an ounce.

The Bloomberg Commodity Index, which measures returns on 22 raw materials, dropped 1.4 percent to the lowest level in data going back to 1991.

Emerging Markets

The MSCI Emerging Markets Index fell 2 percent on Friday and 4.2 percent this week. Shares in Shanghai entered a bear market for the second time in seven months, dropping more than 20 percent from its December high and sinking below its low during the depths of a $5 trillion rout in August.

The Shanghai Composite Index sank 3.6 percent on Friday, extending losses after a report that some banks in Shanghai have halted accepting shares of smaller listed companies as collateral for loans. The Hang Seng China Enterprises Index of mainland stocks listed in Hong Kong fell 2.6 percent to a four-year low.

Currencies

An index of the U.S. currency against 10 of its peers rose for a third week, the longest stretch since July, amid demand for haven assets as oil dropped below $30 for the first time in more than a decade and Chinese stocks led a global rout.

Russia’s ruble sank 2 percent and South Africa’s rand fell 1 .3 percent, leading a gauge of emerging-market currencies down 0.5 percent, capping its third weekly decline. Over the five day period, the ruble slid 3.7 percent and the rand lost 2.1 percent. Brazil’s real and Mexico’s peso lost at least 0.9 percent on Friday.

Australia’s dollar slid 1.7 percent to the weakest level since April 2009. The Canadian dollar fell for an 11th straight day in its longest run of losses on record. New Zealand’s kiwi slumped 1.4 percent.

The yen appreciated against all its 16 major peers as turmoil in markets boosted demand for havens. The euro also gained, while the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index, which tracks the U.S. currency versus 10 major counterparts, rose for a sixth day.

Bonds

Treasury 10-year note yields slipped below 2 percent to the lowest since October, casting doubt on the Fed’s ability to raise interest rates.

U.S. Treasuries gained as traders pulled back expectations for the number of Fed interest-rate increases this year. Data compiled by Bloomberg shows they expect the effective fed funds rate will rise to 0.7 percent in a year’s time, implying one increase, compared with policy maker estimates for four. The 10-year yield fell 10 basis points to 1.99 percent.

The risk premium on the Markit CDX North American High Yield Index, a gauge tied to U.S. junk-rated companies, surged to the highest level since November 2012. Junk-bond funds reported $2.1 billion of redemptions in the week through Jan. 13, according to data provider Lipper.

CEO/Founder Investors King Ltd, a foreign exchange research analyst, contributing author on New York-based Talk Markets and Investing.com, with over a decade experience in the global financial markets.

Business

The Highest Corporation Taxes Around the World and the Main Drivers Behind them

Published

on

tax relief

Taxes Pay by Corporation Around the World and the Main Drivers Behind them

While corporation tax rates are influenced by the country’s definition, there’s clearly a pattern with developing countries and emerging economies paying higher rates to sustain the country.

The top five richest countries in the world’s corporation tax are relatively varied, with Luxemburg standing at 27.08%, Norway at 22%, Iceland at 20%, Switzerland at 18% and Ireland at 12.5%. It would appear that some countries’ cultures factor into how much tax they pay. For example, Scandinavian countries are proud to pay higher taxes to contribute to social welfare.

On average, Africa has the highest corporation tax rate throughout the world’s continents at 28.45% and South America, the second highest with an average rate of 27.63%. However, Europe stands at the lowest rate of 20.27%. Does this contradict the claim that developed countries pay higher tax?

OECD explained that corporation tax plays a key part in government revenue. This is particularly true in developing countries, despite the global trend of falling rates since the 1980s. Let’s take a closer look at two continents, South America and Africa, paying the highest corporation tax rates in the world.

South America has most countries in highest corporation tax top 10

According to data analysed, Brazil and Venezuela have the highest corporation tax at 34%, followed closely by Colombia at 33%, and Argentina at 30%, making South America the continent with the most countries in the top 10 who pay the highest corporation tax.

It is unclear whether South America, as an emerging continent, is charging higher taxes in order to raise government revenue or to benefit from businesses that are looking to expand internationally and enter new markets. According to research, South America is becoming a popular choice for business to enter, with strong trade links and an advantageous geographic location. Indeed, South America is a large continent where some countries are business friendly and others are harder to penetrate.

Africa: the continent with the highest average corporation tax

Being the poorest continent in the world, Africa unsurprisingly has the highest average corporation tax at 28.45%. With the highest in this data being Zambia at 35% and the lowest being Libya and Madagascar at 20%, South Africa stands roughly in the middle at 28%, slightly above average for Africa overall. Does this mean that South Africa is the safest bet for business?

South Africa is one of Africa’s largest economies, with 54 diverse countries in terms of political stability, development, growth, and population. As South Africa has been a relatively slow growth area over the years, corporation tax dropped from 34.55% in 2012 to the current rate — but was this effective? GDP in South Africa has fluctuated quite dramatically since the 1960s. Business favours countries with political stability, which is something South Africa doesn’t currently have. Furthermore, South Africa’s government debt to GDP sits roughly in the middle of the continent’s countries — is this influencing their corporate tax rate?

Country Continent Tax (%)
Puerto Rico North America 37.5
Zambia Africa 35
Brazil South America 34
Venezuela South America 34
France Europe 33.3
Columbia South America 33
Morocco Africa 31
Japan Asia Pacific 30.62
Mexico North America 30
Argentina South America 30
Germany Europe 30
Australia Asia Pacific 30
Philippines Asia Pacific 30
Kenya Africa 30
Nigeria Africa 30
Congo Africa 30
Belgium Europe 29
Pakistan Asia Pacific 29
Sri Lanka Asia Pacific 28
New Zealand Asia Pacific 28
South Africa Africa 28
Luxembourg Europe 27.08
Chile South America 27
Canada North America 26.5
Algeria Africa 26
India Asia Pacific 25.17
Jamaica North America 25
Chile South America 25
Ecuador South America 25
Netherlands Europe 25
Spain Europe 25
Austria Europe 25
South Korea Asia Pacific 25
Bangladesh Asia Pacific 25
China Asia Pacific 25
Indonesia Asia Pacific 25
Zimbabwe Africa 25
Tunisia Africa 25
Greece Europe 24
Italy Europe 24
Malaysia Asia Pacific 24
Israel Middle East 23
Egypt Africa 22.5
Norway Europe 22
Denmark Europe 22
Turkey Europe 22
Sweden Europe 21.4
United States North America 21
Portugal Europe 21
Russia Europe 20
Finland Europe 20
Iceland Europe 20
Afghanistan Asia Pacific 20
Azerbaijan Asia Pacific 20
Kazakhstan Asia Pacific 20
Thailand Asia Pacific 20
Vietnam Asia Pacific 20
Cambodia Asia Pacific 20
Taiwan Asia Pacific 20
Saudi Arabia Middle East 20
Jordan Middle East 20
Yemen Middle East 20
Madagascar Africa 20
Libya Africa 20
Slovenia Europe 19
Czech Republic Europe 19
Poland Europe 19
United Kingdom Europe 19
Belarus Europe 18
Croatia Europe 18
Switzerland Europe 18
Ukraine Europe 18
Singapore Asia Pacific 17
Hong Kong Asia Pacific 16.5
Lithuania Europe 15
Georgia Asia Pacific 15
Maldives Asia Pacific 15
Kuwait Middle East 15
Iraq Middle East 15
Ireland Europe 12.5
Cyprus Europe 12.5
Bulgaria Europe 10
Qatar Middle East 10
Hungary Europe 9
Barbados North America 5.5

 

Lucy Desai is a content writer at QuickBooks, a global company offering the world’s leading accountancy software.

Continue Reading

Economy

Nigeria’s Crude Oil Production Declined to 1.31mbpd in September

Published

on

Oil

Nigeria’s Crude Oil Output Declined from 1.37mbpd in August to 1.31mbpd in September

The Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) reported that Nigeria’s crude oil production declined by 58,000 barrels per day in the Month of September when compared to the nation’s oil production of August.

In its latest oil market report, the cartel said Nigeria produced 1.37 million barrels per day in the month of August but that number declined by 58,000 to 1.31 million barrels per day in September. Bringing the total decline for the 30 days of september to 1.74 million barrels.

On oil price movement in September, the organisation said prices settled lower in the month under review after four consecutive months of gains.

OPEC Reference Basket declined by 8.1 percent or $3.65 in September to $41.54 per barrel, while it moderated to $40.62 per barrel from the year-to-date.

Commenting on the recent changed in Nigeria’s monetary policy rate, the oil cartel said “the recent cut is a part of the policy to continue supporting the economy that plunged 6.1 per cent in the second quarter hit by the global pandemic.

“Nevertheless, Nigeria’s annual inflation rate surged to the highest rate since March 2018 in August 2020, as it rose to 13.22 per cent year-on-year from 12.82 per in in July.

Oil prices sustained bullish trend on Thursday after data showed U.S oil inventories declined last week.

Continue Reading

Economy

Global Economy to Lose $28 Trillion in Five Years -IMF

Published

on

IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva

International Monetary Fund Says Global Economy May Lose $28 Trillion in the Next Five Years to COVID-19

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has said the world’s economy may lose as much as $28 trillion to COVID-19 in the next five years.

The Fund’s Managing Director, Kristalina Georgieva, disclosed this during her opening remarks at the annual general meeting conference held on Wednesday.

She said “The picture over the last few months has become less dire, yet we continue to project the worst global recession since the great depression.

“Growth is expected to fall to -4.4 per cent this year. And over the next five years, the crisis could cost an estimated $28tn in output losses.

“At the same time, we can see stars shining above us. We see unprecedented efforts in vaccine development and treatment.

“We see extraordinary and coordinated fiscal and monetary measures putting a floor under the world economy. And the world is starting to learn how to live with the virus.

“While there is tremendous uncertainty around our forecast, we project a partial and uneven recovery in 2021, with growth expected at 5.2 per cent.”

“As I said in my curtain raiser speech, all countries now face a “long ascent”—a journey that will be difficult, uneven, uncertain, and prone to setbacks.

“Think of how the virus is resurging in a number of countries.”

She also made recommendations, the managing director explained that an unusual crisis requires an unusual approach and solution.

Georgieva said, “In our Global Policy Agenda, which we are releasing today, we outline the measures we believe are needed to overcome the crisis and build a brighter future. Let me highlight three priorities:

“First—continue with essential measures to protect lives and livelihoods.

“A durable economic recovery is only possible if we beat the pandemic everywhere. Stepping up vital health measures is imperative.

“As is fiscal and monetary support to households and firms. These lifelines—such as credit guarantees and wage subsidies—are likely to remain critical for some time, to ensure economic and financial stability.

“Pull the plug too early, and you risk serious, self-inflicted harm.”

Continue Reading

Trending